March: Book Three

by John Lewis

School Library Journal Gr 8 Up-The final installment in the celebrated graphic novel trilogy that documents Congressman Lewis's role in the civil rights movement, this visually arresting volume covers crucial events such as the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church, with Lewis's resounding voice adding a nuanced, deeply emotional perspective. The personal and the political combine for a historical tour de force. Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Library Journal This concluding volume of Lewis's wrenching account follows civil rights workers through two years of life-threatening activism until President Lyndon Johnson signs the 1965 Voting Rights Act. -Powell's peerless ink-wash art varies evocatively from eruptions of darkness for bombings to sketchy pales for Lewis's semiconscious state when beaten by state troopers. Essential background for understanding Black Lives Matter. All ages. (LJ Xpress Reviews, 9/1/16) Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 8 Up-In the final installment in the trilogy, Congressman Lewis concludes his firsthand account of the civil rights era. Simultaneously epic and intimate, this dynamic work spotlights pivotal moments (the bombing of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, AL; the Freedom Summer murders; the 1964 Democratic National Convention; and the Selma to Montgomery marches) through the lens of one who was there from the beginning. Lewis's willingness to speak from the heart about moments of doubt and anguish imbues the book with emotional depth. Complex material is tackled but never oversimplified-many pages are positively crammed with text-and, as in previous volumes, discussion of tensions among the various factions of the movement adds nuance and should spark conversation among readers. Through images of steely-eyed police, motion lines, and the use of stark black backgrounds for particularly painful moments, Powell underscores Lewis's statement that he and his cohorts "were in the middle of a war." These vivid black-and-white visuals soar, conveying expressions of hope, scorn, and devastation and making storied figures such as Martin Luther King Jr., Malcolm X, and Fannie Lou Hamer feel three-dimensional and familiar. VERDICT This essential addition to graphic novel shelves, history curricula, and memoir collections will resonate with teens and adults alike.-Mahnaz Dar, School Library Journal Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list *Starred Review* Opening with the bombing of the Birmingham Baptist Church, this concluding volume in Lewis, Aydin, and Powell's critically acclaimed series highlights the growing violence and tensions among activists in the civil rights movement leading up to Freedom Summer and Johnson's eventual signing of the Voting Rights Act of 1965. As protests and marches and sometimes merely being black in Alabama became increasingly dangerous, opinions among activists in the movement were divided. Continue to march and risk serious harm? Or put their trust in white leaders who were only willing to meet them partway? Though Lewis and Aydin throw a lot at readers in this volume, their message, helped along seamlessly and splendidly by Powell's fantastic, cinematic artwork, is abundantly clear: the victories of the civil rights movement, symbolized in particular by Barack Obama's inauguration, are hard-won and only succeeded through the dogged dedication of a wide variety of people. Perhaps the greatest strength of this last volume is that, despite closing pages during which Lewis suggests the movement is over, the chilling similarities between the violent political atmosphere more than 50 years ago and today remind readers that the drive for justice and equality is ongoing. It's a stirring call to action that's particularly timely in this election year, and one that will resonate and empower young readers in particular. Essential reading.--Hunter, Sarah Copyright 2016 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly The final volume of congressman and civil rights crusader Lewis's memoir, produced with cowriter Aydin, gives a perfect balance of clarity and passion, drawing readers into the emotions of civil rights struggles, while carefully providing context and information, as well as empathy, even for the worst of the movement's foes. Beginning with the church bombing at Birmingham, Ala.; moving through the blood-soaked years from 1963 to 1965; and ending with the signing of the Voting Rights Act, Lewis's on-the-ground viewpoint puts many human faces on the historic battles. The narrative reveals the real work of revolution, focusing not just on the well-known events but the behind-the-scenes decision making, compromises, personal battles, sacrifices, and overall political landscape. It's a dense and informative work propelled by Powell's fluid layouts and vivid depictions of violence and emotion, as well as a personal passion that helps make this memoir timely and relevant, drawing a straight line between decades to compare the modern iterations of a struggle that still continues. (Aug.) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

Library Journal Over three centuries of state-sanctioned antiblack terrorism in North America hits a major stumbling block by the end of Congressman Lewis's best-selling, three-volume memoir about civil rights activism, cowritten with politician and comics creator Aydin. Opening with the deadly bombing of a Birmingham, AL, church, this concluding work follows Lewis and collaborators through attempts to get representation at the 1963 Democratic Convention, later witnessing the passage of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, and the activists' subsequent decision to focus on voting rights for African Americans. Some two years of grueling nonviolent demonstrations and marches follow, many turning into bloody pogroms orchestrated by local lawmen, which build media attention and nationwide public support until President Lyndon Johnson signs the 1965 Voting Rights Act. Throughout, Lewis conveys empathy for the oppressors as well as the oppressed and frankly reveals in-group disagreements. Powell's peerless ink-wash art continues as a perfect vehicle for this drama. Verdict As historical context for today's Black Lives Matter movement, this account of heroism relived, penned with personal and political honesty, is essential reading for tweens through adults, particularly educators and social change activists.-Martha Cornog, Philadelphia Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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