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Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wants us to focus on the 'deeper' problems behind Trump's election

Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez wants us to focus on the 'deeper' problems behind Trump's electionFor many Americans, it's easier to believe that Russia -- not American voters -- installed Trump as president.On Sunday, Attorney General Barr released his summary of Mueller's report, writing that Mueller had found insufficient evidence to prove that Trump conspired with the Russians during the 2016 election. For folks who had hoped that the Mueller report would result in Trump's impeachment, it was heartbreaking.For Congresswoman Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez, however, the Mueller report was more than that. It was a wake-up call.SEE ALSO: Hillary Clinton replied to AOC's take down of Jared Kushner and we all need a minute"Foreign influence" wasn't the only reason Trump got elected, Ocasio-Cortez claimed in response to a tweet by George Takei.Russia was successful precisely because they played on "national wounds that we refuse to address."&> This is the REAL conversation we need to have as a country. &> &> As horrific as this president is, he is a symptom of much deeper problems. &> &> Even foreign influence plays on nat'l wounds that we refuse to address: income inequality, racism, corruption,a willingness to excuse bigotry. https://t.co/wtebX4Tfld&> &> -- Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) March 24, 2019&> He can stay, he can go. He can be impeached, or voted out in 2020. &> &> But removing Trump will not remove the infrastructure of an entire party that embraced him; the dark money that funded him; the online radicalization that drummed his army; nor the racism he amplified+reanimated.&> &> -- Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) March 24, 2019&> In order for us to heal as a nation, we ALL must pursue the hard work of addressing these root causes. &> &> It's not as easy as voting. It means having uncomfortable moments convos w/ loved ones, w/ media, w/ those we disagree, and yes - within our own party, too. &> &> It's on all of us.&> &> -- Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (@AOC) March 24, 2019Others on Twitter agreed with Ocasio-Cortez's assessment. Even if Mueller found that Trump conspired with the Russians, that wouldn't be enough to explain his election. There were millions of voters who wanted Trump to be President -- and that wasn't only the work of bots.&> My thoughts on the Mueller summary are what they were when this whole thing started: despite Putin's best efforts, Russia is not the reason 63 million people voted for Trump, America is. If you don't like that result, think about what America did, not Russia.&> &> -- Julia Ioffe (@juliaioffe) March 24, 2019&> Interesting reaction from @PeteButtigieg on the Mueller report summary: "It would be a mistake for Democrats to think that the way for the Trump presidency to end is by way of investigation." pic.twitter.com/tYduacKV9T&> &> -- Sahil Kapur (@sahilkapur) March 25, 2019Ocasio-Cortez's tweet has received over 97,000 likes at the time of publication. Whether those likes will translate into action is a whole other question. WATCH: Facial recognition coming to U.S. airports by 2021

Mon, 25 Mar 2019 11:18:01 -0400
Antwon Rose trial: White police officer acquitted of murder in fatal shooting of teenager

Antwon Rose trial: White police officer acquitted of murder in fatal shooting of teenagerThe mother of an unarmed black teenager fatally shot by a white police officer as he fled a traffic stop has expressed her anger and devastation over a jurys decision to acquit the officer. Former East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld was charged with homicide for shooting Antwon Rose II last June in one of the many high-profile killings of black people by white police officers. The deadly confrontation, captured on video, led to weeks of unrest and angry protests in the Pittsburgh last year, including a late-night march that shut down a major motorway.

Sat, 23 Mar 2019 14:53:00 -0400
Mike Pence lashes out at Ilhan Omar, 2020 Dems in AIPAC speech

Mike Pence lashes out at Ilhan Omar, 2020 Dems in AIPAC speechThe entire Democratic or Democrat, as the vice president put it, using the ungrammatical truncation that has become popular on the right Party also came under assault from Pence.

Mon, 25 Mar 2019 11:48:53 -0400
The Ford Bronco Will Have a Removable Roof and Doors and Will Go on Sale in Late 2020

The Ford Bronco Will Have a Removable Roof and Doors and Will Go on Sale in Late 2020Ford gave new details about the retro SUV to dealers at a recent event.

Mon, 25 Mar 2019 10:01:00 -0400
Powerball jackpot now $750M after no winning ticket drawn

Powerball jackpot now $750M after no winning ticket drawnAfter no winner claims the prize Saturday, Powerball jackpot increases to fourth-largest in U.S. history.

Sun, 24 Mar 2019 01:00:47 -0400
U.S. airlines visit Boeing as FAA awaits 737 MAX upgrades

U.S. airlines visit Boeing as FAA awaits 737 MAX upgradesThe factory visits indicated Boeing may be near completing a software patch for its newest 737 following a Lion Air crash that killed 189 people in Indonesia last October. This month, a second deadly crash involving an Ethiopian Airlines MAX in Addis Ababa triggered the fleet's worldwide grounding. Boeing has come under global scrutiny along with the U.S. Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), the agency that must approve the software fix and new training.

Sat, 23 Mar 2019 19:45:42 -0400
Harsh rules, violent punishments under IS rule

Harsh rules, violent punishments under IS ruleFor the millions forced to endure the Islamic State group's brutal rule, life in the "caliphate" was a living hell where girls were enslaved, music was banned and homosexuality was punishable by death. The jihadists applied an ultra-conservative interpretation of Islamic law across the swathes of Syria and Iraq that they captured in 2014, torturing or executing anyone who disobeyed. The fall of the last sliver of IS territory in eastern Syria marks the end of their proto-state, once the size of the United Kingdom and home to more than seven million people.

Sat, 23 Mar 2019 20:17:18 -0400
Children of Isil's caliphate left to toil in squalid refugee camps

Children of Isil's caliphate left to toil in squalid refugee campsEight-year-old Hamed cast a critical eye at the at tent peg, raised a hammer above his head and began thwacking it into the hard, stony ground. It is heavy work, and he would rather be in school. But he has little choice. I get about 2,000 lira for putting up one tent, he said, using the popular term here for Syrian pounds. I can do three or four a day, so that is 8,000. That, he said, is just about enough to feed himself, his mother, and her newborn baby twice a day. But we cant eat all the time, he said. "My mother explained, we can't spend so much money on food because we need to buy stuff for the baby now." Hamed is one of about 41,000 children in al-Hol, the largest of three sprawling camps in north eastern Syria that houses former members, children, and prisoners of the Islamic State terrorist group. More than 40,000 children are living in al-Hol, the largest of three sprawing camps in north eastern Syria that houses former members, children, and prisoners of the Islamic State terrorist group Credit: Sam Tarling/The Telegraph The fate of the children who emerged from Isil's doomed caliphate is a matter of humanitarian urgency and critical to international security. And yet the lack of provision made by world governments, including Britain's, is striking. The Telegraph has seen dozens of malnourished infants as Isil families left Baghouz, Isil's last bastion, in the past two weeks. At least 108 children have already died en route to or soon after arriving at the camp, mostly from severe acute malnutrition, pneumonia, and dehydration, according to the international Rescue Committee. The vast majority of them were under five years old, and most of those babies youngerthan one. Many are also carrying serious injuries from shrapnel. The fate of the children who emerged from Isil's doomed caliphate is a matter of humanitarian urgency Credit: Sam Tarling/The Telegraph The casualties included Jarrah Begum, Shamima Begums newborn son, who died of a lung infection last month. Unicef has described the living conditions for those children who reach the camp as "extremely dire." Hamed, who spoke to the Telegraph with the permission of his German mother and on condition of anonymity, said he bitterly misses his old life in Europe. If there was a school, Id go to it, he said, as he took a pause in his tent work to speak to the Telegraph. "But there isn't one here." When I was in Germany I was learning, then in Doula I learnt nothing, he said, using the Arabic word for State the term many Isil families use for the group. They just teach like the Quran... and they teach you that you have to fight. But I said: I dont want to fight. I dont like to fight. I just want to be a normal one, I just want to live in a house and make my job. I dont want to fight, I dont want to be a warrior. Unicef has described the living conditions for those children who reach the camp as 'extremely dire' Credit: Sam Tarling/The Telegraph He said he had left Germany when he was five years old, and only emerged from the Islamic State two months ago. The camp, he said, is a miserable and filthy place. Kids poop everywhere, he said. You have to watch where you walk. You cant just sit anywhere, like you can in Germany. It is not surprising. Adults in the section of the camp where Hamed lives told the Telegraph many of the young children have chronic diarrhoea. Play, if there is such a thing, involves picking on one another or chucking rocks at moving cars. They call me a dog and things. They think it is a joke, said Hamed, when asked about his friends. My mother doesn't like me to be like the other children. She says maybe there is a little baby there, like three years old, and maybe youll hit him. Even though I dont like to throw rocks, he said. Its not a game. They come, they throw, the glass breaks, he said. In Germany it is not like this, youre not hitting on cars. If you want to play you go to your friends, you have friends, they dont call you anything, you play a bit. The larger and more loosely regulated section of the camp reserved for Syrian and Iraqi citizens has a market which is run by Kurdish authorities in al-Hol Credit: Sam Tarling/The Telegraph Most children have little time for that though. Adults here told the Telegraph that almost every child from about the age of eight upwards is a low-paid labourer in the camps grey economy. Theyre already entrepreneurs. I think they wake up and the first thing they think is: who am I going to hit up for money today? said Lorna Henri, a 54-year-old woman from the Seychelles who has become the de-facto guardian of two unaccompanied children in the camp. "I try to give them what I can." Ms Henri said boys generally sent by their mothers to run errands in the camp market, which children can access more easily than adults, and put up tents. Girls clean or offer to cook. The market, in the larger and more loosely regulated section of the camp for Syrian and Iraqi citizens, is crowded with small boys hauling hand carts for 200 Syrian pounds per errand. The market is crowded with small boys hauling hand carts for 200 Syrian pounds per errand Credit: Sam Tarling/The Telegraph Such Dickensian scenes are not unusual amidst humanitarian crisis. And across the Middle East, children are generally expected to pull their own weight at an earlier age than in the West. But the prospects for these children are bleak in more than one way. Radical Isil supporters continue to exert influence inside al-Hol, including by harassing women who want to remove their veils. There have been reports of punishment tent-burnings by an underground religious police, and several women from different countries who the Telegraph spoke to complained about being labelled infidels by their fellow inmates. Without intervention, there is a good chance the children here will be brought up in the same poisonous ideology that turned many of their fathers into terrorists. Without intervention, there is a chance the camp's children here will be brought up in the same poisonous ideology that turned many of their fathers into terrorists The United Nations has expressed alarm at the situation. Last week Henrietta Fore, the executive director of UNICEF, urged member states to take responsibility for children who are their citizens or born to their nationals, and to take measures to prevent children from becoming stateless. Some governments have heeded the call. Last week, the French government said it had evacuatedseveralchildren. But Kurdish officials have told the Telegraph that Britain has refused to take back British Isil members or their children in the camps on the grounds that it has full confidence in the legal and administrative system of Rojava, the unrecognised Kurdish proto-state in northern Syria. Jeremy Hunt, the Foreign Secretary, last week claimed that it would have been too risky to send British officials to save Jarrah Begum, although he remained a British citizen after his mother was stripped of her own citizenship. However, the al-Hol camp is run by the Syrian Democratic Forces, a Kurdish-led Western-backed armed group that Britain is allied to. Journalists, including from the Telegraph, and aid workers visit the camp on a regular basis, safely and without incident. Radical Isil supporters continue to exert influence inside al-Hol, including by harassing women who want to remove their veils Credit: Sam Tarling/The Telegraph Nor is it true, as Mr Hunt claimed, that journalists are afforded special protection unavailable to UK officials in Syria or in the camps. In al-Hol, the foreign women constantly exchange rumours about which governments might take Isil members back. For their children, who committed no crime, the only thing on the horizon is more arduous work. "I'd like to...sell stuff. Or you know, build houses," shrugged Hamed, when asked what he would like to do when he grows up. Those are the only careers on offer in al-Hol camp. He picked up his hammer, and went back to hitting the tent peg. His blows made little impact on the stony ground. Protect yourself and your family by learning more aboutGlobal Health Security

Mon, 25 Mar 2019 04:25:56 -0400
A Retired Brigadier General's Lessons from the War in Afghanistan

A Retired Brigadier General's Lessons from the War in AfghanistanAmerica's top brass can no longer operate under the assumption that every problem is the responsibility of the U.S. military.

Sat, 23 Mar 2019 18:30:00 -0400
Oversight or overreach? Democrats wrestle with Trump probes

Oversight or overreach? Democrats wrestle with Trump probesWASHINGTON (AP) For many Democrats, Robert Mueller's investigation has long stood as their best, last chance to take down President Donald Trump before the next election.

Sun, 24 Mar 2019 22:12:42 -0400
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