Reviews for How to be a rock star

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

How do you become a rock star? Its easier than you might think! In this tongue-in-cheek tale, a raven-haired, olive-skinned child calmly offers suggestions from their own experience, such as using stuffed animals for backup vocals, and, when Mom wont buy an electric guitar, riffing passionately on a broom. The suggestion that creates the most fodder for ironic text and sight gags is letting ones little brother into the band. Younger brothers are not ideal, but yours will have to do. The child endures their brothers toddler-babble, temper tantrums, and even a soiled diaper (slyly labeled wardrobe malfunction) while doggedly pursuing their dream. The text includes both simple statements by the protagonist and occasional speech balloons from olive-skinned Mom and light-skinned, red-bearded Dad. The art complements the lighthearted mood as the large-eyed, cartoonlike characters parade through the pages, sometimes rocking against stark white, sometimes shown against backgrounds with just enough detail to interest viewers without overwhelming them. Theres lots to laugh at: The narrators advice that aspiring rock stars start off by performing familiar songs is paired with an image of them crooning The Wheels on the Bus; Moms and Dads unwelcome suggestions for a band name are, respectively, The Cuddle Monsters and The Not-So-Loud Band. This one is well suited for a family read-aloud or for independent reading by good decoders.(This book was reviewed digitally.) This rocks! (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

How do you become a rock star? It’s easier than you might think! In this tongue-in-cheek tale, a raven-haired, olive-skinned child calmly offers suggestions from their own experience, such as using stuffed animals for backup vocals, and, when Mom won’t buy an electric guitar, riffing passionately on a broom. The suggestion that creates the most fodder for ironic text and sight gags is letting one’s little brother into the band. “Younger brothers are not ideal, but yours will have to do.” The child endures their brother’s toddler-babble, temper tantrums, and even a soiled diaper (slyly labeled “wardrobe malfunction”) while doggedly pursuing their dream. The text includes both simple statements by the protagonist and occasional speech balloons from olive-skinned Mom and light-skinned, red-bearded Dad. The art complements the lighthearted mood as the large-eyed, cartoonlike characters parade through the pages, sometimes rocking against stark white, sometimes shown against backgrounds with just enough detail to interest viewers without overwhelming them. There’s lots to laugh at: The narrator’s advice that aspiring rock stars start off by performing familiar songs is paired with an image of them crooning “The Wheels on the Bus”; Mom’s and Dad’s unwelcome suggestions for a band name are, respectively, “The Cuddle Monsters” and “The Not-So-Loud Band.” This one is well suited for a family read-aloud or for independent reading by good decoders. (This book was reviewed digitally.) This rocks! (Picture book. 4-8) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.