JavaScript must be enabled on your browser for this PAC to work properly.

San Marcos Public Library
625 E. Hopkins • San Marcos, TX 78666 • 512.393.8200  •  smpl@sanmarcostx.gov 
  New Search About the Library Library Events My Account Hot Titles Research Links News & Weather Local History Photographs Subscribe to BookLetters
 

Perloo the bold

by Avi


Book Review

:

Publishers Weekly :

Terms of Use:

Avi (The True Confessions of Charlotte Doyle) flexes his creative muscles again, this time with a book that "fits in the `fun' category," as he comments in a publicity letter. Featuring endearing creatures called Montmers--a combination of jackrabbit, prairie dog and human--this fantasy/adventure also offers a sharp satire on political greed. Mild-mannered Perloo enjoys a quiet life in the Rock Mountains, reading Montmer history and mythology, until his tribe's dying "granter" or leader, Jolaine, names him her successor. But before he even has a chance to accept the honor, he is ousted by Jolaine's scheming son, Berwig, who is eager to declare war against the neighboring Felbarts (they are half-coyote, half-human). Perloo flees for his life, ends up with the Felbarts, negotiates with their leader and single-handedly prevents Berwig's advancing troops from attacking. While keeping bloodshed and violence to a minimum, Avi produces an exciting, suspenseful and witty tale of conspiracy and warfare strategy, pitting Perloo's knowledge and high morality against Berwig's lust for glory. Perloo retains his position as granter just long enough to relinquish it and award the Montmers complete freedom to rule themselves. Formation of a new Montmer government should provide plenty of material for a sequel. Ages 10-up.

Copyright 1998 Cahners Business Information, Inc.
Terms

Book Review

:

School Library Journal :

Terms of Use:

Gr 4-6-In this mildly whimsical fantasy, Avi introduces the Montmers, a race of creatures that are part jackrabbit, part prairie dog, and part human. Jolaine, the elderly chief Granter of the tribe, takes ill and dies, but not before she bestows her leadership on Perloo, a bookish loner who prefers history to reality, instead of on her pompous son, Berwig. Perloo is aghast at this new title and is immediately thrown into conflict with Berwig, who institutes martial law and accuses his rival of murdering Jolaine. Political subterfuge flourishes as Berwig's counselor plots against him. Still trying to resist his responsibility, Perloo is taken captive by the Montmers' archenemies, the Felbarts, part human, part coyote, who are preparing to defend themselves against Berwig's declaration of war. Perloo rises to the occasion in an ending reminiscent of David and Goliath, and learns some valuable lessons about courage. Unfortunately, the action lacks suspense, and the Montmers themselves fail to elicit sympathy. The story is sprinkled with words of wisdom from the creatures' philosopher, Mogwat the Magpie, who preaches peace, unity, courage, truth, and democracy; although these are admirable values, they become burdensome in the thin text. Though this tale is geared for a younger audience, it invites comparison to Brian Jacques's "Redwall" series (Philomel), and there it falls short, lacking the depth of characterization and spirit, and the rich detail of those books. A light read.-Jennifer A. Fakolt, Denver Public Library

Copyright 1998 Cahners Business Information, Inc.
Terms


Back

 

Powered by: YouSeeMore © The Library Corporation (TLC) Catalog Home Top of Page