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The Buddy files : the case of the lost boy

by Dori Hillestad Butler


Reviews

Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

This first installment in a new trilogy for early readers introduces a dog whose first family went away and never returned. Buddy ended up in the pound, where he was adopted by a boy, Connor, and his mom, who coincidently live in his old neighborhood. Buddy, who enjoyed sleuthing with his original owner, is now trying to solve the mystery of his missing family, a mission he will pursue throughout the series. First, though, he has an immediate problem to solve: Connor has disappeared. Buddy tries to find him, relying on methodical reasoning and unexpected assistance from a cat who can read. The story moves quickly to its obvious conclusion, but unanswered questions will propel readers to the series' second title. Particularly well drawn are scenes in which Buddy tries to overcome dog-to-human communication obstacles, the numerous distractions of delicious smells, and Connor's reluctance to love Buddy as he deals with changes in his own life. With twists and turns, humor, and a likable canine character, this series should find a wide fan base.--Dean, Kara Copyright 2010 Booklist


School Library Journal
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Gr 2-3-King, a golden retriever detective, has lost his owners. When their Uncle Marty takes him to the pound, he is determined to find them. Things seem to be going his way when he discovers that the new family that adopts him lives right behind his people's house. His mission takes a detour, however, when his new boy, Connor, disappears while taking him for a walk. Now King must outrun humans, decode strange cat messages, and track down Connor's eggs, bacon, toothpaste, and dirt smell to solve the case. The type is large, the text is easy, and the occasional black-and-white illustrations complement the text well. The clues are unique and true to the fact that a dog is telling the story. The addition of paw prints used as bullet points in King's lists of what he knows about the case and chapter headings with titles like "Nose to the Ground" add to this involving story. Fans of dog stories, mysteries, or readers reluctant to start chapter books will appreciate this story.-Kira Moody, Hunter Public Library, West Valley City, UT Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.


Publishers Weekly
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

This chipper novel launches Butler's (The Truth About Truman School) Buddy Files series, narrated by a chatty golden retriever. After his owner Kayla and her father disappear, Buddy lands in the dreaded "P-O-U-N-D. We don't say it, we spell it." His plan to escape and find them gets derailed when he's adopted by a boy named Connor ("What? No, you can't take me... I already have a family," Buddy protests). Buddy's internal monologue can be both perceptive and amusing. He observes that Connor, who moved away from his father and friends after his parents' divorce, "smells sad," and when the nine-year-old boy goes missing, the canine laments, "I feel like I am losing humans left and right." Aided by sleuthing skills that Kayla taught him, a keen sense of smell, and a tip from an observant cat, Buddy locates Connor. It's a straightforward mystery, but readers should be drawn in by Buddy's exuberant voice and readily recognize the high stakes and emotions at play. The Case of the Mixed-up Mutts and The Case of the Missing Family pub simultaneously. Ages 6-8. (Mar.) Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.


Book list
From Booklist, Copyright © American Library Association. Used with permission.

This first installment in a new trilogy for early readers introduces a dog whose first family went away and never returned. Buddy ended up in the pound, where he was adopted by a boy, Connor, and his mom, who coincidently live in his old neighborhood. Buddy, who enjoyed sleuthing with his original owner, is now trying to solve the mystery of his missing family, a mission he will pursue throughout the series. First, though, he has an immediate problem to solve: Connor has disappeared. Buddy tries to find him, relying on methodical reasoning and unexpected assistance from a cat who can read. The story moves quickly to its obvious conclusion, but unanswered questions will propel readers to the series' second title. Particularly well drawn are scenes in which Buddy tries to overcome dog-to-human communication obstacles, the numerous distractions of delicious smells, and Connor's reluctance to love Buddy as he deals with changes in his own life. With twists and turns, humor, and a likable canine character, this series should find a wide fan base.--Dean, Kara Copyright 2010 Booklist


School Library Journal
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Gr 2-3-King, a golden retriever detective, has lost his owners. When their Uncle Marty takes him to the pound, he is determined to find them. Things seem to be going his way when he discovers that the new family that adopts him lives right behind his people's house. His mission takes a detour, however, when his new boy, Connor, disappears while taking him for a walk. Now King must outrun humans, decode strange cat messages, and track down Connor's eggs, bacon, toothpaste, and dirt smell to solve the case. The type is large, the text is easy, and the occasional black-and-white illustrations complement the text well. The clues are unique and true to the fact that a dog is telling the story. The addition of paw prints used as bullet points in King's lists of what he knows about the case and chapter headings with titles like "Nose to the Ground" add to this involving story. Fans of dog stories, mysteries, or readers reluctant to start chapter books will appreciate this story.-Kira Moody, Hunter Public Library, West Valley City, UT (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.


Publishers Weekly
(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

This chipper novel launches Butler's (The Truth About Truman School) Buddy Files series, narrated by a chatty golden retriever. After his owner Kayla and her father disappear, Buddy lands in the dreaded "P-O-U-N-D. We don't say it, we spell it." His plan to escape and find them gets derailed when he's adopted by a boy named Connor ("What? No, you can't take me... I already have a family," Buddy protests). Buddy's internal monologue can be both perceptive and amusing. He observes that Connor, who moved away from his father and friends after his parents' divorce, "smells sad," and when the nine-year-old boy goes missing, the canine laments, "I feel like I am losing humans left and right." Aided by sleuthing skills that Kayla taught him, a keen sense of smell, and a tip from an observant cat, Buddy locates Connor. It's a straightforward mystery, but readers should be drawn in by Buddy's exuberant voice and readily recognize the high stakes and emotions at play. The Case of the Mixed-up Mutts and The Case of the Missing Family pub simultaneously. Ages 6-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved


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