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Welcome to the Palestine Public Library. We offer access to ideas, information, and experiences through a variety of materials to enrich the lives of residents of Palestine and Anderson County, Texas. Our collection includes high-interest magazines, newspapers, books, audiobooks, DVDs, a Spanish collection, and a Special Collections room with rare books on genealogy and local history. Patrons can also visit our Digital Branch to check out digital eBooks and audiobooks. 

We offer a weekly story time for children and computer classes and author visits for adults. Onsite information services include computer access for all ages, free Wi-fi connections, and copy, printing, and fax services. Other free online resources include Tutor.com, Mango Languages, Freegal music, Ancestry Library Edition, and our online library catalog. Visit us onsite and online to find something for everyone.

Hot Titles
Book Jacket
Personal
by Lee Child

Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9780804178747 How do you find Jack Reacher, the ultimate unencumbered man, who's always on the move to the next place? You put a personal ad in the Army Times, of course. No, Reacher's not a subscriber, but there's always an abandoned copy in a bus depot somewhere. So Reacher finds the ad, and, suddenly, our guy is tracking a sniper who may be planning to pick off a few heads of state at an upcoming G8 meeting in London. But not just any sniper. This is personal, too, as Reacher, back in his MP days, coerced this particular sniper into confessing to a murder. Now the sniper is out of the brig and looking to do some sniping, warming up on Reacher before moving on to the G8 turkey shoot. So it's off to London for Reacher and his minder, a pill-popping, twentysomething CIA analyst with little knowledge of the field. That changes quickly, as the unlikely pair (a rookie analyst and a retired military cop) skirmish with East End mobsters on the way to confronting the sniper. Child sets up a thriller premise better than anybody, expertly mixing gun talk, trivia, and tension and, when the time comes, detailing the bloodletting with the care of a connoisseur. This time, though, the dipsy-do of a plot twist is apparent at 100 yards, which hurts a little. But it's still Reacher cracking heads with gusto, which, for thriller devotees, makes up for almost anything. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Child is the alpha dog of thriller writers, each new book zooming to the top of best-seller lists with the velocity of a Reacher head butt.--Ott, Bill Copyright 2014 Booklist
Library Journal (c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780804178747 Starred Review. In Child's 19th Jack Reacher novel (after Never Go Back), our loner protagonist is on a bus nearing Seattle when he picks up a copy of the Army Times newspaper that contains an ad asking him to contact Rick Schroeder, an old army connection. Paired with rookie Casey Nice from the Special Forces, Reacher is sent on a mission to find the sniper who tried to kill the French president with a rifle shot from three-quarters of a mile away. Their mission takes them to England with multiple suspects in mind. But Jack is watching someone with a personal grudge against him, an American marksman named John Kott. At the same time, being undercover avails them little government help. Casey's personal demons and Jack's memory of another young agent's death make this a taut and relentless suspense story. VERDICT Longtime fans won't be disappointed by this suspense-filled, riveting thriller. Those readers who haven't experienced this irresistible series should definitely start at the beginning and catch up to this book.-Susan Carr, Edwardsville P.L., IL (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9780804178747 How do you find Jack Reacher, the ultimate unencumbered man, who's always on the move to the next place? You put a personal ad in the Army Times, of course. No, Reacher's not a subscriber, but there's always an abandoned copy in a bus depot somewhere. So Reacher finds the ad, and, suddenly, our guy is tracking a sniper who may be planning to pick off a few heads of state at an upcoming G8 meeting in London. But not just any sniper. This is personal, too, as Reacher, back in his MP days, coerced this particular sniper into confessing to a murder. Now the sniper is out of the brig and looking to do some sniping, warming up on Reacher before moving on to the G8 turkey shoot. So it's off to London for Reacher and his minder, a pill-popping, twentysomething CIA analyst with little knowledge of the field. That changes quickly, as the unlikely pair (a rookie analyst and a retired military cop) skirmish with East End mobsters on the way to confronting the sniper. Child sets up a thriller premise better than anybody, expertly mixing gun talk, trivia, and tension and, when the time comes, detailing the bloodletting with the care of a connoisseur. This time, though, the dipsy-do of a plot twist is apparent at 100 yards, which hurts a little. But it's still Reacher cracking heads with gusto, which, for thriller devotees, makes up for almost anything. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: Child is the alpha dog of thriller writers, each new book zooming to the top of best-seller lists with the velocity of a Reacher head butt.--Ott, Bill Copyright 2014 Booklist
Library Journal (c) Copyright Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780804178747 Starred Review. In Child's 19th Jack Reacher novel (after Never Go Back), our loner protagonist is on a bus nearing Seattle when he picks up a copy of the Army Times newspaper that contains an ad asking him to contact Rick Schroeder, an old army connection. Paired with rookie Casey Nice from the Special Forces, Reacher is sent on a mission to find the sniper who tried to kill the French president with a rifle shot from three-quarters of a mile away. Their mission takes them to England with multiple suspects in mind. But Jack is watching someone with a personal grudge against him, an American marksman named John Kott. At the same time, being undercover avails them little government help. Casey's personal demons and Jack's memory of another young agent's death make this a taut and relentless suspense story. VERDICT Longtime fans won't be disappointed by this suspense-filled, riveting thriller. Those readers who haven't experienced this irresistible series should definitely start at the beginning and catch up to this book.-Susan Carr, Edwardsville P.L., IL (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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Book Jacket
The Presidents Club
by Nancy Gibbs

Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9781439127704 If you think you know the history of the American presidency since World War II, think again. Gibbs and Duffy (TIME magazine deputy managing editor and executive editor, respectively) tell the inside story of specific U.S. Presidents from Harry S. Truman through Barack Obama from the perspective of the use each made of previous Presidents' experience, knowledge, and political skills. In-depth reports of unlikely relationships between opponents such as Truman and former President Hoover, Nixon and LBJ, and Kennedy and Eisenhower show that each man knew when to put politics and personal feelings aside for the good of the country and administration success. Especially engaging is the authors' account of the improbable mutual admiration society that developed between George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton. The authors cover Nixon's careful cultivation of his successors as he set about to rehabilitate his image, and they give readers a new appreciation for his invaluable advice on foreign policy and his near-faultless political instinct (albeit with exceptions). Jimmy Carter's postpresidential independence and unwillingness to follow instructions frustrated sitting Presidents, but results often showed Carter's intuition was correct. With research in presidential papers and the published record, this is a fascinating and fun read that will appeal to political junkies and history buffs alike. Highly recommended.-Jill Ortner, SUNY Buffalo Libs. (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9781439127704 Silence, Gibbs and Duffy aver, is one rule of the ex-presidents club, one evidently with a time limit, since they offer 600-plus pages of Oval Office anecdotes from Truman to Obama. Developing other informal protocols of membership in their accounts, Gibbs and Duffy underscore the advice given and tasks undertaken by former chief executives at the behest of the incumbent. They don't mention the retirement correspondence between club founders Jefferson and Adams but start with Truman's summons of Herbert Hoover from exile to help fix up postwar Europe. This sets up a suprapartisan ethos as an aspiration for interpresidential relations, one difficult to maintain, as attested by Truman's feud with Eisenhower, Nixon and Johnson's skulduggery over Vietnam peace talks during the 1968 election, and Reagan's nomination challenge to Ford in 1976. Political battles over, presidents indulge in, if not mutual admiration, at least commiseration on the unique responsibilities of the office: witness JFK's consultation with Ike after the Bay of Pigs fiasco. For its behind-the-scenes flavor and accent on personalities, Gibbs and Duffy's production will score with the political set.--Taylor, Gilbert Copyright 2010 Booklist
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9781439127704 In this anecdote-rich book, Gibbs and Duffy, the deputy managing editor and executive editor of Time, respectively, maintain that the relationships among former presidents have been characterized by "cooperation, competition, and consolation." Perhaps the most interesting tie they discuss is their first: Faced with the great need for food relief in Europe in 1945, Harry Truman and Herbert Hoover (who had provided food relief to Europe in WWI) overcame their mutual distrust to rally non-isolationist Republicans around the Marshall Plan. Another striking example of bipartisan cooperation, was that between George H.W. Bush and Bill Clinton to raise millions for the victims of the 2004 tsunami, Hurricane Katrina, and the Haitian earthquake. But the authors' most remarkable stories are of competition, such as candidate Richard Nixon pursuing his own diplomatic track with North Vietnam, undermining LBJ's efforts to secure a peace deal to end the Vietnam War. As for consolation, and plain practical help, Gibbs and Duffy (co-authors of The Preacher and the Presidents, about the Rev. Billy Graham) provide numerous examples, such as Kennedy relying on Eisenhower (whom he once called "that old asshole") for advice following the Bay of Pigs fiasco. While this work could have used some pruning, it is canny, vivid, and informative on an important and little-explored subject. 16 pages of b&w photos. Agent: Bob Barnett(May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
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Book Jacket
A Fine Balance
by Rohinton Mistry

Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9780679446088 The setting of Mistry's quietly magnificent second novel (after the acclaimed Such a Long Journey) is India in 1975-76, when Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, defying a court order calling for her resignation, declares a state of emergency and imprisons the parliamentary opposition as well as thousands of students, teachers, trade unionists and journalists. These events, along with the government's forced sterilization campaign, serve as backdrop for an intricate tale of four ordinary people struggling to survive. Nave college student Maneck Kohlah, whose parents' general store is failing, rents a room in the house of Dina Dalal, a 40-ish widowed seamstress. Dina acquires two additional boarders: hapless but enterprising itinerant tailor Ishvar Darji and his nephew Omprakash, whose father, a village untouchable, was murdered as punishment for crossing caste boundaries. With great empathy and wit, the Bombay-born, Toronto-based Mistry evokes the daily heroism of India's working poor, who must cope with corruption, social anarchy and bureaucratic absurdities. Though the sprawling, chatty narrative risks becoming as unwieldy as the lives it so vibrantly depicts, Mistry combines an openness to India's infinite sensory detail with a Dickensian rendering of the effects of poverty, caste, envy, superstition,corruption and bigotry. His vast, wonderfully precise canvas poses, but cannot answer, the riddle of how to transform a corrupt, ailing society into a healthy one. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780679446088 In mid-1970s urban India-a chaos of wretchedness on the streets and slogans in the offices-a chain of circumstances tosses four varied individuals together in one small flat. Stubbornly independent Dina, widowed early, takes in Maneck, the college-aged son of a more prosperous childhood friend and, more reluctantly, Ishvar and Om, uncle and nephew tailors fleeing low-caste origins and astonishing hardships. The reader first learns the characters' separate, compelling histories of brief joys and abiding sorrows, then watches as barriers of class, suspicion, and politeness are gradually dissolved. Even more affecting than Mistry's depictions of squalor and grotesque injustice is his study of friendships emerging unexpectedly, naturally. The novel's coda is cruel and heart-wrenching but deeply honest. This unforgettable book from the author of Such a Long Journey (LJ 4/15/91) is highly recommended.-Janet Ingraham, Worthington P.L., Ohio (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Choice Copyright American Library Association, used with permission. 9780679446088 A worthy successor to Mistry's award-winning Such a Long Journey, this wonderful, baggy, Dickensian narrative follows the fortunes of an independent widow, a college student, and two impoverished tailors who share a crowded apartment. The novel includes a large cast of memorable characters, whose stories range from brutal caste struggles in small villages to homelessness in flimsy shacks surrounding the sprawling city teeming with pavement dwellers, beggars, rent collectors, con men, and corrupt police. The novel's world is often cruel and unfeeling, but the characters struggle on, trying to achieve lives of dignity and meaning. Valmik (proofreader and sometime flack for a bogus guru) provides the novel's title: "The secret of life was to balance hope and despair." The Vishram Vegetarian Hotel cook tells the tailors, "You fellows are amazing.... Each time you come here you have a new adventure story." "It's not us; it's this city," replies the tailor, "a story factory, that's what it is, a spinning mill." Mistry's humorous and compassionate tangle of tales and characters is a story factory, too. And we listen spellbound to a master story spinner at work. D. R. Stoddard Anne Arundel Community College
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9780679446088 The setting of Mistry's quietly magnificent second novel (after the acclaimed Such a Long Journey) is India in 1975-76, when Prime Minister Indira Gandhi, defying a court order calling for her resignation, declares a state of emergency and imprisons the parliamentary opposition as well as thousands of students, teachers, trade unionists and journalists. These events, along with the government's forced sterilization campaign, serve as backdrop for an intricate tale of four ordinary people struggling to survive. Nave college student Maneck Kohlah, whose parents' general store is failing, rents a room in the house of Dina Dalal, a 40-ish widowed seamstress. Dina acquires two additional boarders: hapless but enterprising itinerant tailor Ishvar Darji and his nephew Omprakash, whose father, a village untouchable, was murdered as punishment for crossing caste boundaries. With great empathy and wit, the Bombay-born, Toronto-based Mistry evokes the daily heroism of India's working poor, who must cope with corruption, social anarchy and bureaucratic absurdities. Though the sprawling, chatty narrative risks becoming as unwieldy as the lives it so vibrantly depicts, Mistry combines an openness to India's infinite sensory detail with a Dickensian rendering of the effects of poverty, caste, envy, superstition,corruption and bigotry. His vast, wonderfully precise canvas poses, but cannot answer, the riddle of how to transform a corrupt, ailing society into a healthy one. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved
Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780679446088 In mid-1970s urban India-a chaos of wretchedness on the streets and slogans in the offices-a chain of circumstances tosses four varied individuals together in one small flat. Stubbornly independent Dina, widowed early, takes in Maneck, the college-aged son of a more prosperous childhood friend and, more reluctantly, Ishvar and Om, uncle and nephew tailors fleeing low-caste origins and astonishing hardships. The reader first learns the characters' separate, compelling histories of brief joys and abiding sorrows, then watches as barriers of class, suspicion, and politeness are gradually dissolved. Even more affecting than Mistry's depictions of squalor and grotesque injustice is his study of friendships emerging unexpectedly, naturally. The novel's coda is cruel and heart-wrenching but deeply honest. This unforgettable book from the author of Such a Long Journey (LJ 4/15/91) is highly recommended.-Janet Ingraham, Worthington P.L., Ohio (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Choice Copyright American Library Association, used with permission. 9780679446088 A worthy successor to Mistry's award-winning Such a Long Journey, this wonderful, baggy, Dickensian narrative follows the fortunes of an independent widow, a college student, and two impoverished tailors who share a crowded apartment. The novel includes a large cast of memorable characters, whose stories range from brutal caste struggles in small villages to homelessness in flimsy shacks surrounding the sprawling city teeming with pavement dwellers, beggars, rent collectors, con men, and corrupt police. The novel's world is often cruel and unfeeling, but the characters struggle on, trying to achieve lives of dignity and meaning. Valmik (proofreader and sometime flack for a bogus guru) provides the novel's title: "The secret of life was to balance hope and despair." The Vishram Vegetarian Hotel cook tells the tailors, "You fellows are amazing.... Each time you come here you have a new adventure story." "It's not us; it's this city," replies the tailor, "a story factory, that's what it is, a spinning mill." Mistry's humorous and compassionate tangle of tales and characters is a story factory, too. And we listen spellbound to a master story spinner at work. D. R. Stoddard Anne Arundel Community College
...More
  • Story time

     PRESCHOOL STORY TIME !!! 

     Please join us on Wednesday mornings at 10 a.m. for stories, crafts and more.

     

     

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