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New York Times Bestsellers
Week of March 23, 2014
FICTION
#1  (Last Week: - Weeks on List: 1)  
Power Play
Book Jacket   Danielle Steel
#2  (Last Week: - Weeks on List: 1)  
Night Broken
Book Jacket   Patricia Briggs
 
#3  (Last Week: - Weeks on List: 1)  
Be Careful What You Wish For
 Jeffrey Archer
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#4  (Last Week: - Weeks on List: 1)  
Stone Cold
 C J Box
Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780399160769 In this 14th outing (after Breaking Point), Joe Pickett is back at his job as game warden with a pay increase, retention of his seniority, and the title of "special liaison to the executive branch." Joe is once again working on a special assignment for Wyoming governor Rulon, who has an unhappy relationship with the federal government. To keep the Feds from running roughshod over his state and its citizens, Rulon sends Joe to Medicine Wheel County to investigate quietly a mysterious man named -Wolfgang Templeton who might be operating an elite murder-for-hire operation. What Joe uncovers is a tangled puzzle of philanthropy, murder, and corrupt county and state officials, mixed together with the reappearance of his old friend Nate Romanowski and Joe's mother-in-law, Missy Vankueran. Never one to hesitate, Joe jumps right into the fray. At the same time Joe's mind is also with daughter Sheridan's challenges at the university and foster daughter April's obsession with a rodeo star. VERDICT With each book, Box just gets better. Nonstop action, a twisty plot, and great characters make his latest a must-read for fans of this series. [See Prepub Alert, 9/16/13.]-Patricia Ann Owens, formerly with -Illinois Eastern Community Colls., Mt. Carmel (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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#5  (Last Week: 1 Weeks on List: 2)  
Words Of Radiance
Book Jacket   Brandon Sanderson
#6  (Last Week: 3 Weeks on List: 21)  
The Goldfinch
Book Jacket   Donna Tartt
 
#7  (Last Week: 4 Weeks on List: 10)  
The Invention Of Wings
 Sue Monk Kidd
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#8  (Last Week: 2 Weeks on List: 2)  
The Bootlegger
 Clive Cussler and Justin Scott
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#9  (Last Week: 5 Weeks on List: 5)  
Private L.a.
Book Jacket   James Patterson and Mark Sullivan
#10  (Last Week: 6 Weeks on List: 3)  
The Chase
Book Jacket   Janet Evanovich and Lee Goldberg
 


NONFICTION
#1  (Last Week: 1 Weeks on List: 2)  
Uganda Be Kidding Me
 Chelsea Handler
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#2  (Last Week: - Weeks on List: 1)  
10% Happier
 Dan Harris
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#3  (Last Week: 3 Weeks on List: 25)  
Killing Jesus
Book Jacket   Bill O'Reilly and Martin Dugard
#4  (Last Week: 5 Weeks on List: 24)  
David And Goliath
Book Jacket   Malcolm Gladwell
 
#5  (Last Week: 7 Weeks on List: 51)  
Lean In
 Sheryl Sandberg with Nell Scovell
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#6  (Last Week: 4 Weeks on List: 161)  
Unbroken
 Laura Hillenbrand
Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9781400064168 The author of Seabiscuit now brings us a biography of World War II prisoner of war survivor Louis Zamperini (b. 1917). A track athlete at the 1936 Munich Olympics, Zamperini became a B-24 crewman in the U.S. Army Air Force. When his plane went down in the Pacific in 1943, he spent 47 days in a life raft, then was picked up by a Japanese ship and survived starvation and torture in labor camps. Eventually repatriated, he had a spiritual rebirth and returned to Japan to promote forgiveness and healing. Because of the author's popularity, libraries will want this book both for general readers who like a good story and for World War II history buffs; however, it's not essential reading for those who read Zamperini's autobiography, Devil at My Heels, with David Rensin, in its 2003 edition. [See Prepub Alert, LJ 7/10.] (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9781400064168 From the 1936 Olympics to WWII Japan's most brutal POW camps, Hillenbrand's heart-wrenching new book is thousands of miles and a world away from the racing circuit of her bestselling Seabiscuit. But it's just as much a page-turner, and its hero, Louie Zamperini, is just as loveable: a disciplined champion racer who ran in the Berlin Olympics, he's a wit, a prankster, and a reformed juvenile delinquent who put his thieving skills to good use in the POW camps, In other words, Louie is a total charmer, a lover of life-whose will to live is cruelly tested when he becomes an Army Air Corps bombardier in 1941. The young Italian-American from Torrance, Calif., was expected to be the first to run a four-minute mile. After an astonishing but losing race at the 1936 Olympics, Louie was hoping for gold in the 1940 games. But war ended those dreams forever. In May 1943 his B-24 crashed into the Pacific. After a record-breaking 47 days adrift on a shark-encircled life raft with his pal and pilot, Russell Allen "Phil" Phillips, they were captured by the Japanese. In the "theater of cruelty" that was the Japanese POW camp network, Louie landed in the cruelest theaters of all: Omori and Naoetsu, under the control of Corp. Mutsuhiro Watanabe, a pathologically brutal sadist (called the Bird by camp inmates) who never killed his victims outright-his pleasure came from their slow, unending torment. After one beating, as Watanabe left Louie's cell, Louie saw on his face a "soft languor.... It was an expression of sexual rapture." And Louie, with his defiant and unbreakable spirit, was Watanabe's victim of choice. By war's end, Louie was near death. When Naoetsu was liberated in mid-August 1945, a depleted Louie's only thought was "I'm free! I'm free! I'm free!" But as Hillenbrand shows, Louie was not yet free. Even as, returning stateside, he impulsively married the beautiful Cynthia Applewhite and tried to build a life, Louie remained in the Bird's clutches, haunted in his dreams, drinking to forget, and obsessed with vengeance. In one of several sections where Hillenbrand steps back for a larger view, she writes movingly of the thousands of postwar Pacific PTSD sufferers. With no help for their as yet unrecognized illness, Hillenbrand says, "there was no one right way to peace; each man had to find his own path...." The book's final section is the story of how, with Cynthia's help, Louie found his path. It is impossible to condense the rich, granular detail of Hillenbrand's narrative of the atrocities committed (one man was exhibited naked in a Tokyo zoo for the Japanese to "gawk at his filthy, sore-encrusted body") against American POWs in Japan, and the courage of Louie and his fellow POWs, who made attempts on Watanabe's life, committed sabotage, and risked their own lives to save others. Hillenbrand's triumph is that in telling Louie's story (he's now in his 90s), she tells the stories of thousands whose suffering has been mostly forgotten. She restores to our collective memory this tale of heroism, cruelty, life, death, joy, suffering, remorselessness, and redemption. (Nov.) -Reviewed by Sarah F. Gold (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9781400064168 A second book by the author of Seabiscuit (2001) would get noticed, even if it weren't the enthralling and often grim story of Louie Zamperini. An Olympic runner during the 1930s, he flew B-24s during WWII. Taken prisoner by the Japanese, he endured a captivity harsh even by Japanese standards and was a physical and mental wreck at the end of the war. He was saved by the influence of Billy Graham, who inspired him to turn his life around, and afterward devoted himself to evangelical speeches and founding boys' camps. Still alive at 93, Zamperini now works with those Japanese individuals and groups who accept responsibility for Japanese mistreatment of POWs and wish to see Japan and the U.S. reconciled. He submitted to 75 interviews with the author as well as contributing a large mass of personal records. Fortunately, the author's skills are as polished as ever, and like its predecessor, this book has an impossible-to-put-down quality that one commonly associates with good thrillers. HIGH-DEMAND BACKSTORY: This departure from the author's previous best-seller will nevertheless be promoted as necessary reading for the many folks who enjoyed the first one or its movie version.--Green, Roland Copyright 2010 Booklist
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#7  (Last Week: 2 Weeks on List: 3)  
The Future Of The Mind
Book Jacket   Michio Kaku
Publishers Weekly (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved 9780385530828 In this expansive, illuminating journey through the mind, theoretical physicist Kaku (Physics of the Future) explores fantastical realms of science fiction that may soon become our reality. His futurist framework merges physics with neuroscience to model how our brains construct the future, and is loosely applied to demonstrations that "show proof-of-principle" in accomplishing what was previously fictional: that minds can be read, memories can be digitally stored, and intelligences can be improved to great extents. The discussion, while heavily scientific, is engaging, clear, and replete with cinematic references. Kaku's claims, however, often lack generalizability: his points about human thought are derived from research studies and patterns that emerge from discrete areas of analysis under highly sophisticated technological surveillance. The place of these esoteric conclusions in the nuanced processes of our daily life is rarely explained. Likewise, each issue raised, while fascinating, is equally fleeting: topics skip from telepathy helmets to cell phone MRIs in just over a page. Legal and ethical complications, too, arise with each predicted advance, though aren't given the attention they demand. These new mental frontiers make for captivating reading, yet Kaku's optimism and enthusiasm provides cover for what are mostly overhyped claims. Agent: Stuart Krichevsky. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.
Book list From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission. 9780385530828 Facts to ponder: there are as many stars in our galaxy (about 100 billion) as there are neurons in your brain; your cell phone has more computing power than NASA had when it landed Apollo 11 on the moon. These seemingly unrelated facts tell us two things: our brains are magnificently complex organisms, and science fiction has a way of becoming reality rather quickly. This deeply fascinating book by theoretical physicist Kaku explores what might be in store for our minds: practical telepathy and telekinesis; artificial memories implanted into our brains; and a pill that will make us smarter. He describes work being done right now on using sensors to read images in the human brain and on downloading artificial memories into the brain to treat victims of strokes and Alzheimer's. SF fans might experience a sort of breathless thrill when reading the book This stuff is happening! It's really happening! and for general readers who have never really thought of the brain in all its glorious complexity and potential, the book could be a seriously mind-opening experience.--Pitt, David Copyright 2010 Booklist
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#8  (Last Week: 6 Weeks on List: 21)  
Things That Matter
Book Jacket   Charles Krauthammer
 
#9  (Last Week: - Weeks on List: 1)  
Jesus
 James Martin
Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted. 9780062024237 In this work-part travelog, part biblical commentary, part memoir, part meditation-prolific Jesuit author Martin (culture editor, America magazine; My Life with the Saints) devotes a chapter to each of the towns he visited while on a pilgrimage in the Holy Land, villages in which particular incidents in the life of Jesus took place. He explains and reflects on the relevant Gospel stories as he proceeds. For example, in the chapter "Tabgha," he considers the story of the multiplication of the loaves and fishes, and reflects on an incident in his experience when Jesus made small things great, and suggests how this event can help those who feel their efforts are inadequate. The chapters are ordered according to the life of Jesus, and do not correspond to the order of Martin's visit, so the account isn't so much about places as it is about coming to understand Jesus better and fostering a deeper relationship with him. Martin often refers accessibly to the scholarship about a particular biblical passage, with the relevant text provided in full at the end of each section. VERDICT This will appeal to readers (not just Catholics) seeking an introduction to the Gospels that is personal but rooted in serious -scholarship.-Augustine J. Curley, Newark Abbey, NJ (c) Copyright 2014. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.
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#10  (Last Week: - Weeks on List: 1)  
Overwhelmed
 Brigid Schulte
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