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Health News
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Stimulant boosts function in patients recovering from depression

By Kate Kelland LONDON (Reuters) - People recovering from depression but struggling with its effect on memory, concentration and cognitive function may benefit from the stimulant modafinil, according to results of a small study published on Tuesday. Modafinil is a generic drug usually prescribed for sleep disorders such as narcolepsy. Describing the results as promising, Muzaffer Kaser from Cambridge's psychiatry department explained how the effects of depression on brain performance in everyday life are often sidelined as both patients and doctors focus on improving mood.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 19:12:27 -0500
Will colicky babies benefit from acupuncture?

By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Colicky babies may cry less after treatment with a scaled-back version of acupuncture, according to a new study - but the results are controversial. Researchers in Sweden found colicky babies spent less time crying and were less likely to be colicky after two weeks of acupuncture compared to babies receiving usual care. "There is no safe medical treatment that has effect, but a nutritional supplement of Lactobacillus reuteri can be tried, and meeting a supportive professional may relieve the burden of colic," lead author Dr. Kajsa Landgren, of Lund University, told Reuters Health in an email.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 18:55:42 -0500
Acupuncture may cure baby colic, says criticised study

A duo from the Lund University's medicine faculty tested the traditional Chinese needle-piercing remedy in a trial involving nearly 150 babies between two and eight weeks oldSwedish researchers said Tuesday acupuncture "appears to reduce crying" in babies suffering from colic. A duo from the Lund University's medicine faculty tested the traditional Chinese needle-piercing remedy in a trial involving nearly 150 babies between two and eight weeks old. Compared to babies who did not undergo the needle treatment, infants who received acupuncture over two weeks exhibited "a significant relative reduction" in crying, the team found.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 18:47:52 -0500
Will colicky babies benefit from acupuncture?

By Andrew M. Seaman (Reuters Health) - Colicky babies may cry less after treatment with a scaled-back version of acupuncture, according to a new study - but the results are controversial. Researchers in Sweden found colicky babies spent less time crying and were less likely to be colicky after two weeks of acupuncture compared to babies receiving usual care. "There is no safe medical treatment that has effect, but a nutritional supplement of Lactobacillus reuteri can be tried, and meeting a supportive professional may relieve the burden of colic," lead author Dr. Kajsa Landgren, of Lund University, told Reuters Health in an email.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 18:10:34 -0500
U.S. high school soccer concussions on the rise

By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - As soccer has soared in popularity in recent decades, concussion rates for youth players have also surged, a U.S. study suggests. Researchers examined data on high school soccer players from 2005 to 2014 and found non-concussion injury rates declined for boys and were little changed for girls. The significant rise in concussion rates could be mainly due to a better recognition of concussion by medical and coaching staff, study leader Dr. Morteza Khodaee, a sports medicine researcher at the University of Colorado School of Medicine, said in an email.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 17:08:58 -0500
What You Need to Know About the Deadly 'Superbug' Infection Resistant to All FDA-Approved Antibiotics

What You Need to Know About the Deadly 'Superbug' Infection Resistant to All FDA-Approved AntibioticsThe rise of drug-resistant bacterial "superbugs" have been a concern of public health officials for years, but the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has reported a worse-case scenario -- a woman with a bacterial infection that was resistant to all FDA-approved treatments. A Nevada woman died in September after being infected with type of drug-resistant bacteria called Klebsiella pneumonaiae that was resistant to all antibiotics available in the U.S., the CDC reported on Friday. After doing tests, her doctors found the bacteria -- which belonged to a class of drug-resistant bugs called carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae (CRE) -- were resistant to all forms of FDA-approved antibiotics.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 15:35:15 -0500
Brazil issues first license for sale of a cannabis-based drug

Brazilian healthcare regulator Anvisa on Monday said it had issued the country's first license for sale of a cannabis-based drug in the country after years of legal wrangling with patients. The multiple sclerosis treatment, an oral spray derived from marijuana and developed by Britain's GW Pharmaceuticals PLC, is known as Sativex internationally and will be sold in Brazil under the brand name Mevatyl. The legal status of cannabis-based drugs has been a thorny issue in Brazil for years, with several patients fighting in the courts to circumvent prohibition.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 14:29:40 -0500
Friends may influence children's fear and anxiety

By Lisa Rapaport (Reuters Health) - Parents may have a lot to do with how children react to scary things, but a new study suggests kids response to fear may also be heavily influenced by their friends. After speaking to friends, children tended to shift their opinions to match how their friends felt about the animals, the study found. Studies show that children tend to choose friends who have similar attributes to themselves and that they can also become more similar through their interactions, said lead study author Jinnie Ooi, a psychology researcher at the University of East Anglia in the UK.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 13:03:32 -0500
Construction workers still at high risk for strains and sprains

By Shereen Lehman (Reuters Health) - Despite significant improvements in the last 25 years, U.S. construction workers are still at high risk for on-the-job injuries to muscles, tendons, joints and nerves, a new study reports. Collectively known as work-related musculoskeletal disorders, or WMSDs, they can be costly. The estimated wage loss for private wage-and-salary construction workers in 2014 was US$46 million, the study authors say.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 12:36:33 -0500
Nighttime social media use is affecting the sleep of 1 in 5 young people finds new study

Nighttime social media use is affecting the sleep of 1 in 5 young people finds new studyNew UK research has found that as many as 1 in 5 young people regularly wake up in the night to use social media. Carried out by Professor Sally Power, Co-Director (Cardiff) Wales Institute for Social & Economic Research, Data & Methods (WISERD), the research looked at more than 900 school pupils aged between 12-15 years, who were asked to complete a questionnaire on their sleep and nighttime social media habits. The students were asked about their bedtimes and waking times as well as how often they woke up at night to check social media.

Mon, 16 Jan 2017 12:24:45 -0500
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