Reviews for Ra the mighty : the crocodile caper

Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Ra, the Pharaohs self-centered, pampered cat and self-proclaimed Great Detective, is not interested in a new mystery. Ra and his buddiesKhepri, a scarab beetle, and Miu, the kitchen cathave already solved two mysteries, but Ra much prefers a lazy life of napping and snacking. He is looking forward to a cruise along the Nile with Pharaoh and his children, but Pharaoh must remain in Thebes, and Ra is charged with the task of accompanying and protecting 12-year-old crown prince Dedi and his 6-year-old sister, Kiya. When they dock at the palace of Lady Satiah, vicious crocodiles surround their barge. Lady Satiah behaves very strangely, and her household is filled with odd characters. She takes the childrens jewelry, separates them from their trusted servants, and brags about her remarkable zoo. When Dedi disappears, Ra and his cohorts find themselves with a multitude of suspects, both human and animalalong with plenty of red herrings, intrigue, danger, and some surprise twistsbefore the culprits are apprehended and the crime is solved. Hornes elongated, exaggerated black-and-white illustrations perfectly capture the setting and characters idiosyncrasies. The animal leads engage in delightful, often hilarious repartee, speaking in modern syntax easily understood by young readers. While keeping the action moving briskly, Greenfield seamlessly provides information about the mores and culture of ancient Egypt. A fun romp with a feline detective. (glossary of names, authors note) (Mystery. 7-11) Copyright Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.


Kirkus
Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Ra, the Pharaoh’s self-centered, pampered cat and self-proclaimed Great Detective, is not interested in a new mystery. Ra and his buddies—Khepri, a scarab beetle, and Miu, the kitchen cat—have already solved two mysteries, but Ra much prefers a lazy life of napping and snacking. He is looking forward to a cruise along the Nile with Pharaoh and his children, but Pharaoh must remain in Thebes, and Ra is charged with the task of accompanying and protecting 12-year-old crown prince Dedi and his 6-year-old sister, Kiya. When they dock at the palace of Lady Satiah, vicious crocodiles surround their barge. Lady Satiah behaves very strangely, and her household is filled with odd characters. She takes the children’s jewelry, separates them from their trusted servants, and brags about her remarkable zoo. When Dedi disappears, Ra and his cohorts find themselves with a multitude of suspects, both human and animal—along with plenty of red herrings, intrigue, danger, and some surprise twists—before the culprits are apprehended and the crime is solved. Horne’s elongated, exaggerated black-and-white illustrations perfectly capture the setting and characters’ idiosyncrasies. The animal leads engage in delightful, often hilarious repartee, speaking in modern syntax easily understood by young readers. While keeping the action moving briskly, Greenfield seamlessly provides information about the mores and culture of ancient Egypt. A fun romp with a feline detective. (glossary of names, author’s note) (Mystery. 7-11) Copyright © Kirkus Reviews, used with permission.

Back