National Science Teachers Association
2010
2010
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Susan Hughes

School Library Journal Gr 6-9-Similar to PBS's History Detectives, this book explains how historians have collaborated with experts in various fields (medicine, space, archaeology, meteorology, etc.) to resolve disappearances that have long puzzled them. Each chapter discusses one mystery, beginning with historical background. The modern scientific processes used to help solve it are then discussed, followed by the often-fascinating conclusion that was drawn. Famous bodies (Anastasia Romanov and George Mallory) have been identified, a lost city (Ubar) has been found, and mysterious journeys (Hsu Fu's, the Star Dust, and the INS Dakar) have been mapped. Several of the subjects (Hatshepsut, the Anasazi, John Franklin, and George Mallory) are covered in multiple books for this age range, but others are not as easily found. The writing is clear and engaging. The full-color illustrations are a mix of photographs, maps, and flat, animation-style art. Each chapter ends with a conclusion, but also poses a question that still remains to be solved. The book contains a glossary and an extensive index, but no notes or other bibliographic information. Students doing reports or historically minded browsers are the audience for this book. It's not an essential purchase, but it is an interesting one.-Lisa Crandall, formerly at Capital Area District Library, Holt, MI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Lori Mortensen

Publishers Weekly Foucault was small and slow moving as a child, but he had a clever mind. Drawn to science as an adult, he made an incredible discovery, one that would allow him to prove the unprovable-that the Earth does indeed spin on an axis. Mortensen's prose infuses this small scientific drama with remarkable tension, while Allen's dramatically lit paintings, often organized into elegant panels, have a cinematic quality and amplify the action even further. It should enchant not only science lovers but any child who has felt awkward and dreamed big. Ages 7-9. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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School Library Journal Gr 2-4-A 19th-century figure formerly relegated to entries in collective biographies at last gets his due in a solo picture-book biography. The pendulum that bears his name, designed as proof that Earth spins on its axis, is still regarded as one of the most elegant scientific demonstrations ever. Despite this and other technical achievements, however, Foucault spent most of his short life outside the French scientific establishment. Why? A lack of advanced academic credentials for one thing, suggests Mortensen in her matter-of-fact narrative and more detailed afterword-but also, without making a direct claim, she points to evidence that he may have suffered from a spectrum disorder. Allen's digitally finished paintings mix sequential panels and larger tableaus to depict a frail, thoughtful-looking young man working alone in a tidy, shadowy workshop or showing his latest invention to small groups of marveling onlookers. Readers will marvel too, at the genius of this little-known scientific wizard.-John Peters, New York Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Joyce Sidman

Book list *Starred Review* Like Sidman's Caldecott Honor Book, Song of the Water Boatman and Other Pond Poems (2005), this picture book combines lyrical poetry and compelling art with science concepts. Here, poems about the woods at night reveal exciting biology facts that are explained in long notes on each double-page spread. In a poem about crickets, lines describe the raucous scrape / of wing against wing, while a prose passage explains that the cricket's wing has a serrated file, which the cricket rubs against a hard scraper on its other wing to attract a mate, creating a sound called stridulation that can swell to deafening levels. The facts are further reinforced in the accompanying picture, which shows the small file on a cricket's wing. In an opening note, Allen explains his elaborate, linoleum-block printmaking technique, and each atmospheric image shows the creatures and the dense, dark forest with astonishing clarity. Looking closely at a picture of a snail, for example, readers will see the physical detail, described in an adjacent poem, in the small animals' moist, sluglike bodies, riding on a cushion of slime. The thrilling title poem captures the drama of predator and prey: a mouse in the undergrowth flees an owl's hooked face and / hungry eye. A final glossary concludes this excellent, cross-curricular title.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly "Welcome to the night!" cries the opening poem in this celebration of nocturnal life. Everything from snails to mushrooms has a role to play and something different to say (the title is taken from a concrete poem about a horned owl, narrated by its would-be prey: "Perched missile,/ almost invisible, you/ preen silent feathers,/ swivel your sleek satellite/ dish of a head"). Spiders offer advice, porcupettes pirouette, and the moon laments the dawn, all illuminated by debut talent Allen's detailed yet moody prints, which encapsulate the mysteries and magic of the midnight hours. Opposite each poem is a short note on the featured creature, explaining its appearance and habits. In Sidman's delicious poems, darkness is the norm, and there's nothing to fear but the rising sun. Ages 6-9. (Sept.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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School Library Journal Gr 3-6-Sidman continues her explorations of natural history in this set of poems about nocturnal life in the forest. As in her other collections, each selection is set in an expansive spread that includes a factual discussion of the featured subject. The illustrations are bold, richly detailed linoleum prints colored in gouache. The 12 poems are led by a scene setting "Welcome to the Night" and go on to feature 9 different creatures and some mushrooms with a concluding lament by the moon as night fades into morning. Sidman adroitly applies varied poetic forms and rhyme schemes. The title's dark emperor, the great horned owl, lends its shape to the one concrete poem, and the closing lament is in the medieval style known as an ubi sunt. The poetry is reflective and at times philosophical. "Build a frame/and stick to it,/I always say./Life's a circle..Eat your triumphs,/eat your mistakes:/that way your belly/will always be full.," advises the night spider. Other poems are playful and some just a bit confusing. The porcupine poem explains that the infant of this species is known as a porcupette; the repeated use of "baby porcupette" seems oddly redundant. The bookmaking is beautiful with the concept of night lending itself generously to poetry. It invites lingering enjoyment for nature and poetry fans, and, as with Sidman's earlier collections, it might be used with varied curriculums.-Margaret Bush, Simmons College, Boston (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Deborah Kogan Ray

School Library Journal Gr 3-6-Using the same tawny palette as in Down the Colorado (Farrar, 2007), Ray has painted soft-edged backdrops for her lucid exposition of the life work of Earl Douglass, fossil-finder extraordinaire. Benefitting from the Cope/Marsh "Bone Wars" and the deep pockets of philanthropist Andrew Carnegie, Douglass embarked on a1909 expedition to the Uinta Basin (Utah) to find Carnegie's demand for "something big." What he found was BIG-a bone bed that ultimately became Dinosaur National Monument. The readable text is bracketed by large illustrations and smaller diagrams, charts, maps, and, most importantly, direct quotes from Douglass's field journals. Added for readers' edification is a cast of characters of 10 Jurassic dinosaurs found at Dinosaur Mountain, a large map of the monument (which spreads across the Utah/Colorado border), an extensive author's note, a brief bio of Douglass, and an even briefer one of Carnegie. With its sand-colored pages, the warmth of the palette, and the brown script of the journal notes, this is a vibrant window into the burgeoning world of American paleontology a century ago. A rich find.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list When 165,000 people flocked to see the first exhibited dinosaur, in 1868, it commenced the Bone Wars a race by rival paleontologists to turn up and identify the most spectacular of extinct giants. Archrivals stooped to underhanded methods, including spying, bribery, and even hijacking fossil shipments. But when Earl Douglass was employed by Andrew Carnegie to find something big, he set out with the best of intentions and found the biggest rewards: a mountain in Utah that would ultimately reveal some of the greatest and grandest dinosaur skeletons anyone had ever seen. Although Ray's expressive art lacks the fine detail to help illustrate complicated excavation techniques, it excels in capturing the grandeur and wonder of key moments, like Douglass stumbling upon a six-foot thigh bone or the uncovering of a massive line of a vertebrae. Excited journal entries from Douglass enliven the informative text, and small sketch book-style drawings of fossils and tools add a scholarly touch. This will push all-new buttons of the dinosaur lovers in your life.--Kraus, Daniel Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly This dynamic book brings readers into the "Bone Wars" of the late 19th and early 20th century, focusing on Earl Douglass, a fossil expert whose search for "something big" made him one of the era's most successful "bone hunters." Ray's sweeping scenes of the dry Utah landscape capture the excitement of the hunt, while drawings of the paleontologists' presumed fossil finds, hand tools, and graphs and charts offer insight into the meticulous nature of the work. Clear, rich prose documents Douglass's quest-"His heart pounded with anticipation as he began to chip into the sandstone. Slowly, one tailbone after another was revealed"-and his own field notes are integrated throughout. Ages 8-up. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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2010
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Brenda Z. Guiberson

Book list From a polar bear in the Arctic to a butterfly on a Californian prairie, this handsome picture book shows the threat of global warming, one creature at a time. An orangutan in Borneo escapes a wildfire in its dried-out forest, but afterward, it can't find food or shade. An orange-spotted filefish searches for a meal of coral polyps among the bleached skeleton of the too-warm Great Barrier Reef. On each double-page spread, the detailed oil paintings pair with rhythmic text ( Glaciers are melting, seas rising ), and each grim scenario ends with the same urgent question: Who can help? The climactic closing spread gives the reassuring answer: People can! An accompanying world map shows the habitat of each creature and emphasizes the sense of global connections among all living beings, while a final page features practical suggestions for kids to practice conservation in their daily lives.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2009 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Gr 1-3-Full-page, full-color illustrations demonstrate the plight of many animals throughout the world brought about by climate changes. From polar bears unable to reach hunting grounds, to the Alaska caribou and the South African long-nosed fly, each of a dozen animals is shown as affected by changes in habitat, food supply, migration patterns, and drought as a result of global warming. On every page, readers are asked, "Who can help?" with the final answer, "People can!" Unfortunately, the energy-saving suggestions that are offered do not directly address the animals in crisis. The picture-book format is effective and lovely to look at, but the bleak outlook suggested for these creatures may be too grim for the intended audience without accompanying adult discussion or possible positive remedies.-Eva Elisabeth VonAncken, Trinity-Pawling School, Pawling, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Publishers Weekly Gently urging, emotionally resonant text describes the impacts of global warming-"Because the Arctic keeps getting warmer... the [polar] bear can't gain the weight she needs to raise a cub"-followed by variations on a plaintive refrain: "Who can help the polar bear?" The sickly palette of Wallace's oil paintings emphasizes a planet in need: wildfire threatens an orangutan; a water hole dries up. In the end, three children plant a tree on a hill: "a caribou, a pika, and even a Bengal tiger cannot stop the warming. Who can? People can!" Ages 4-8. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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2010
2010
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Jessica Rudolph

School Library Journal Gr 4-6-Students with a penchant for the extreme will relish the dangerous situations described in these fact-filled works, whose first-person accounts add nail-biting immediacy. The books describe some of the same threats as those covered in ABDO's "Weather Watchers," but here the pitch of the content and the appetite of the audience are a perfect match. While focusing on one survivor's experiences before, during, and after events such as Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Chicago's deadly 1995 heat wave, the books also relate the history of the event and similar disasters, and scientific cause and effect. While the authors don't gloss over human suffering, including the poverty that exacerbated tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina, they refrain from political commentary. Large, clear color photographs and effective scientific diagrams add to the successful presentations. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 4-6-Students with a penchant for the extreme will relish the dangerous situations described in these fact-filled works, whose first-person accounts add nail-biting immediacy. The books describe some of the same threats as those covered in ABDO's "Weather Watchers," but here the pitch of the content and the appetite of the audience are a perfect match. While focusing on one survivor's experiences before, during, and after events such as Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Chicago's deadly 1995 heat wave, the books also relate the history of the event and similar disasters, and scientific cause and effect. While the authors don't gloss over human suffering, including the poverty that exacerbated tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina, they refrain from political commentary. Large, clear color photographs and effective scientific diagrams add to the successful presentations. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 4-6-Students with a penchant for the extreme will relish the dangerous situations described in these fact-filled works, whose first-person accounts add nail-biting immediacy. The books describe some of the same threats as those covered in ABDO's "Weather Watchers," but here the pitch of the content and the appetite of the audience are a perfect match. While focusing on one survivor's experiences before, during, and after events such as Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Chicago's deadly 1995 heat wave, the books also relate the history of the event and similar disasters, and scientific cause and effect. While the authors don't gloss over human suffering, including the poverty that exacerbated tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina, they refrain from political commentary. Large, clear color photographs and effective scientific diagrams add to the successful presentations. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 4-6-Students with a penchant for the extreme will relish the dangerous situations described in these fact-filled works, whose first-person accounts add nail-biting immediacy. The books describe some of the same threats as those covered in ABDO's "Weather Watchers," but here the pitch of the content and the appetite of the audience are a perfect match. While focusing on one survivor's experiences before, during, and after events such as Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Chicago's deadly 1995 heat wave, the books also relate the history of the event and similar disasters, and scientific cause and effect. While the authors don't gloss over human suffering, including the poverty that exacerbated tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina, they refrain from political commentary. Large, clear color photographs and effective scientific diagrams add to the successful presentations. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 4-6-Students with a penchant for the extreme will relish the dangerous situations described in these fact-filled works, whose first-person accounts add nail-biting immediacy. The books describe some of the same threats as those covered in ABDO's "Weather Watchers," but here the pitch of the content and the appetite of the audience are a perfect match. While focusing on one survivor's experiences before, during, and after events such as Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Chicago's deadly 1995 heat wave, the books also relate the history of the event and similar disasters, and scientific cause and effect. While the authors don't gloss over human suffering, including the poverty that exacerbated tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina, they refrain from political commentary. Large, clear color photographs and effective scientific diagrams add to the successful presentations. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 4-6-Students with a penchant for the extreme will relish the dangerous situations described in these fact-filled works, whose first-person accounts add nail-biting immediacy. The books describe some of the same threats as those covered in ABDO's "Weather Watchers," but here the pitch of the content and the appetite of the audience are a perfect match. While focusing on one survivor's experiences before, during, and after events such as Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Chicago's deadly 1995 heat wave, the books also relate the history of the event and similar disasters, and scientific cause and effect. While the authors don't gloss over human suffering, including the poverty that exacerbated tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina, they refrain from political commentary. Large, clear color photographs and effective scientific diagrams add to the successful presentations. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 4-6-Students with a penchant for the extreme will relish the dangerous situations described in these fact-filled works, whose first-person accounts add nail-biting immediacy. The books describe some of the same threats as those covered in ABDO's "Weather Watchers," but here the pitch of the content and the appetite of the audience are a perfect match. While focusing on one survivor's experiences before, during, and after events such as Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Chicago's deadly 1995 heat wave, the books also relate the history of the event and similar disasters, and scientific cause and effect. While the authors don't gloss over human suffering, including the poverty that exacerbated tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina, they refrain from political commentary. Large, clear color photographs and effective scientific diagrams add to the successful presentations. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

School Library Journal Gr 4-6-Students with a penchant for the extreme will relish the dangerous situations described in these fact-filled works, whose first-person accounts add nail-biting immediacy. The books describe some of the same threats as those covered in ABDO's "Weather Watchers," but here the pitch of the content and the appetite of the audience are a perfect match. While focusing on one survivor's experiences before, during, and after events such as Hurricane Katrina, the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami, and Chicago's deadly 1995 heat wave, the books also relate the history of the event and similar disasters, and scientific cause and effect. While the authors don't gloss over human suffering, including the poverty that exacerbated tragedies such as Hurricane Katrina, they refrain from political commentary. Large, clear color photographs and effective scientific diagrams add to the successful presentations. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Jill Rubalcaba and Peter Robertshaw

School Library Journal Gr 8 Up-The authors have taken an unusual approach in this look at members of the human family tree. Rather than sketch all of human prehistory, they focus on four particular discoveries, noting the deductions that scientists have made and the debates that these conclusions have sparked. The finds that they detail are Turkana Boy, Lapedo Child, Kennewick Man, and Otzi the Iceman. This approach will be helpful for students as it makes clear the type of work done by paleontologists, archaeologists, and their ilk. There is a lot of painstaking effort and a lot of careful thought. It is particularly interesting to learn what sorts of debates an activity as innocent-seeming as archaeology can engender. Full-color photos, an occasional map or diagram, and an illustrated time line enhance the presentation. As they have focused on only four individuals, readers may miss their personal favorites, such as "Lucy" and the recently discovered Homo floresiensis, nicknamed "hobbits." There are also some scientific points that aren't explained as well as they might be. In their discussion of genetics, for example, the authors refer to C, G, A, and T without ever explaining that these are the initials of cytosine, guanine, adenine, and thymine. While there are a few print sources from recent years, many go back 10 years or more. Despite a few quibbles, this is an excellent look at an engaging area of science that should find broad readership and use.-Eric Norton, McMillan Memorial Library, Wisconsin Rapids, WI (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list Archaeology and paleontology are the exciting focus in this accessible account of four hominins who lived long before recorded history. The authors explore not only how and where their remains were discovered but also what they tell scientists today about how they lived and why they died out. Were Neanderthals brainy or brutish? Man or beast? When did language begin? The informal style never oversimplifies the gripping science and technology, and the authors raise as many questions as they answer in the detailed chapters, which cover each of the four fossils and the research and debate that surround them. The design is lackluster but readable, with clear type on thick paper and occasional full-color illustrations of sites, skeletons, and scientists at work. Meticulous source notes and bibliographies (including Web sites) at the end of each chapter will stimulate further research. Adults will want this, too.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2010
2010
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Seymour Simon

Publishers Weekly In a serious but not somber introduction to global warming, Simon, in collaboration with the Smithsonian Institution, describes contributing factors, signs, and repercussions of rising Earth temperatures with enough statistics to inform school reports-"There is 30 percent more carbon dioxide in the air than there was 150 years ago"-and enough full-color photographs to engage. Endnotes list things individuals and families can do to help curb climate change, as a hopeful counterbalance. Ages 5-9. (Mar.) Copyright 2010 Reed Business Information.

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2010
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Elizabeth Carney

Book list An official companion book to the Great Migrations television series on the National Geographic channel, this colorful book offers excellent photos of eight migrating animals: Mali elephants, red crabs, monarch butterflies, golden jellyfish, zebras, army ants, wildebeests, and sperm whales. On the double-page spreads carrying information, some sentences are printed in standard paragraph form, while others are singled out and printed in uppercase letters, and sometimes in a form more vertical than horizontal. Within those sentences, some words and phrases are further emphasized with the use of still larger type in different colors. Although these visual elements give the pages a dynamic look, they detract from the experience of actually reading the text and absorbing the content. Still, the writing style is often lively, the maps are excellent, and the photos are exceptionally clear and vibrant. Readers enthralled by the TV series may want to have a look.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2010
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Sarah C. Campbell

Book list This book introduces the Fibonacci sequence, which begins 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13. Each new number is determined by adding the two preceding it. The presentation uses color photos of flowers with different numbers of petals to illustrate the beginning of the sequence, follows up with photographs highlighting the different spirals seen on pinecones, sunflowers, and pineapples, and includes a picture showing the chambers in a cut-away nautilus shell. The design of the first series of illustrations graphically expresses the Fibonacci sequence by beginning with very small photos and gradually increasing their size in proportion to the numbers in sequence. The book's intended audience is unclear. The short, simple text on some early pages ( This is a flowering quince. Count the petals. ) will probably put off older readers, while young children may have difficulty even predicting the next number in the sequence, much less understanding the appended More about Fibonacci Numbers page. Though the Fibonacci sequence is seldom taught in elementary schools, teachers wanting to introduce it will find the basic ideas here, illustrated with attractive photos.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Gr 3-6-This slim, attractive volume makes clear the appearance and significance of Fibonacci numbers in nature, both through simple, precise explanations and eye-catching photographs. With plenty of white space and crisp images, the design of the book is appealing. Details about Fibonacci himself, other interesting mathematical concepts such as the "golden ratio," and a glossary are included. With such an obscure topic, this book may have a difficult time finding an audience, but math teachers looking to add an interesting element to a lesson will find this a solid choice, and future mathematicians will be drawn into the magic and mystery of Fibonacci numbers.-Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Publishers Weekly This husband-and-wife team, who collaborated on Wolfsnail: A Backyard Predator, turn their attention to the Fibonacci sequence of numbers, employing photographs from nature, basic addition, and reader-directed text to explain it. Beginning with an image of a seed, Campbell moves through the first numbers, adding images of flowers with petals that match Fibonacci numbers (the flowers are set within boxes sized to correspond to the numbers as well). By the time readers reach a yellow cosmos, with eight petals, the flowers take up an entire page, laying visual groundwork for a later representation of the numbers as a spiral. The Campbells also explore more complex appearances of the sequence in nature and note that while Fibonacci popularized these numbers, they had already been known to Indian scholars. Besides being eye-catching, the photographs ought to prove invaluable for visual learners (spiral patterns in a pinecone are darkened for visibility). Kids should be left with a clear understanding of the pattern and curious about its remarkable prevalence in nature. Ages 5-11. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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2010
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Sandra Markle

Book list Set in an Australian temperate rain forest, this picture book opens with a pair of tiny hip-pocket frogs guarding their eggs from predators while waiting for them to hatch. Finally, a dozen teeny tadpoles emerge and slowly climb into their father's hidden hip pockets. There they develop and grow for several weeks, while their father struggles to find food and avoid predatory animals such as the dusky antechinus (a marsupial) and the currawong (a bird). Shown on the book's dust jacket in actual size (less than an inch), the frog looks larger in the illustrations but remains a vulnerable, sympathetic figure to follow through the pages. Markle writes with clarity and precision, while Marks' evocative watercolor, ink, and pencil artwork brings the frog's world to life. Well suited to classroom units on rain forests, food chains, or frogs, this lovely picture book offers close-up views of an intriguing little animal living in a particular ecosystem.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal K-Gr 4-In Australia's temperate rainforest, a miniature drama plays out among the leaves on the forest floor. Two hip-pocket frogs, less than an inch long, guard their eggs until tiny tadpoles emerge and wriggle up the male's hind legs into hidden pockets. Once the eggs hatch, the female's work is done, but for the next 30 days, the male must hunt for food and keep his skin wet while eluding predators. By the time the froglets emerge from his pockets, he has reached a creek bank where they can find the moisture they need for their continued survival. An animal glossary includes information about the currawong, antechinus, quoll, and other creatures the frog encounters. Marks's vibrant watercolors offer close-up views of the frog and his surroundings, revealing interconnections that cannot be seen easily by much larger humans. A photo of the hip-pocket frog appears in Markle's Slippery, Slimy Baby Frogs (Walker, 2006). Mark W. Moffett's Face to Face with Frogs (National Geographic) and Nic Bishop Frogs (Scholastic, both 2008) both use dramatic photos to provide a more wide-ranging introduction to these fascinating amphibians. While libraries will want to make sure those titles are in their collections before adding this one, Markle's new book offers a unique introduction to a specific species.-Kathy Piehl, Minnesota State University, Mankato (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Stephen Buchmann
 
2010
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Steve Jenkins and Robin Page

Publishers Weekly Who better than a husband and wife team to spotlight intriguing partnerships in nature? Among the many relationships Jenkins and Page (How Many Ways Can You Catch a Fly?) explore is that of the upside-down jellyfish and the crab it lives upon. "The jellyfish's stinging tentacles provide protection in return for crab meal leftovers." Jenkins's meticulous cut-paper illustrations, as eye-catching as ever, reveal fascinating stories of animal symbiosis on each page. The paneled layout-graphic novel style-offers a dynamic format for these concise, present-tense stories of mutualism, complete with catchy titles. "Dinner is served" reads the spread about a seagull and a sunfish (the massive sunfish attracts the seagull with its fin, and in turn the bird eats parasites living on the fish). Closeups, aerial views, and vignettes of animals realistically rendered in Jenkins's trademark collage have a cinematic quality. An author note about the different types of symbiotic relationships, as well as appended pages detailing each animal's size, habitat, and diet, reinforce the book's value as a scientific introduction to the topic. Ages 6-9. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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Book list *Starred Review* The husband-and-wife team behind such award-winning titles as What Do You Do with a Tail like This? (2003) presents another creative, wholly engaging introduction to science in this picture book that explores unexpected animal partnerships. Many of the spotlighted relationships illustrate mutualism, a type of symbiosis that benefits all the animals involved: African helmeted turtles, for example, nibble away unwanted algae from hippos, whose backs, in turn, provide sunny basking spots for their cold-blooded cleaners. The spreads have an exciting, comics-inspired feel. Each page combines panels of multiple images, rendered in Jenkins' superbly crafted paper-collage style, with brief lines of concise, clear text and attention-grabbing headlines ( Armed and Ready ) that direct the narrative flow. The format is entertaining, but as always, the authors' attention to scientific facts is serious, and their lucid explanations avoid any suggestion that these arrangements are cozy pairings between interspecies BFFs: Animals . . . remain in these relationships only because the partnership somehow helps them survive. These fascinating stories from the natural world will easily interest young people, many of whom will want to move on from the appended notes about each featured critter to more in-depth titles that further explain the mysteries of animal symbiosis.--Engberg, Gillian Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal K-Gr 3-This book introduces readers to symbiosis, focusing on relationships in which each partner benefits from the collaboration. While readers may be familiar with birds that groom mammals or small fish that clean bigger ones, more unusual pairings include the boxer crab, which can pluck poisonous anemone, use them as lethal pom-poms with which to chase away larger prey, and then return the favor with stray scraps of food dropped from its imprecise claws. The book concludes with a relationship that will be familiar to many readers-that of humans and dogs. It is a nice way to expand the topic into the domestic sphere, as well as highlighting an area in which the relationship between humans and animals is mutually beneficial, and not simply tilted in our favor. Jenkins's trademark collage illustrations continue to impress with their vibrant and stunning manipulation of cut and torn paper. The book is formatted in a block, comic-book style and is written at a level that is accessible to young browsers yet suitable for older researchers. Supplementary information about the size, habitat, and diet of each animal is included in the back matter. This title is another outstanding offering from this extraordinarily talented, wonderfully symbiotic couple.-Kara Schaff Dean, Walpole Public Library, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Robert B. Haas

Book list On the heels of his African Critters (2008), Haas, a veteran wildlife photographer, proffers another set of photos from several of his albums for adults. Here he accompanies the pictures which range from shots of a herd of wildebeests harassed by lions to Alaskan bears in a salmon stream, humpback whales cavorting in waters off Greenland, and a stork mincing oh-so-carefully past a group of watching caimans in Brazil with anecdotal commentary on the hazards and pleasures of viewing nature from an aerial perspective. Highlights include one gory shot of a crocodile chowing down on an unidentifiable haunch and Haas' renowned picture (which he swears is not Photoshopped) of a bird-shaped flock of flamingos. Though many of the animals on view are not identified in either captions or the index, this does provide young viewers with an unusual perspective on the natural world.--Peters, John Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Marc Aronson

Publishers Weekly Illustrated with full-color photos, this informative and perceptive book focuses on the Riverside Project's archeological expedition to Stonehenge. Aronson, who visited the team on the dig, provides a fresh first-person perspective as he explains that while Stonehenge has traditionally been viewed as an ancient temple, a team member proposes that it might have been more like a graveyard, used "to usher, to welcome, the honored dead into their permanent home." As Aronson recounts how the team interprets the data they collect, he emphasizes the value of remaining open to new ideas: "We are seeing more in Stonehenge because more people are looking, and in more ways." A revitalizing perspective on an enigmatic place. Ages 10-up. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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2010
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Jean McElroy
2010
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Lola Schaefer

Publishers Weekly An expert blend of art and science, this large-format picture book offers expressive life-size illustrations of 11 animals-and their meals. For a worm, that means a speck of dirt; for a Komodo dragon that is dripping saliva, it's a snake, which it gulps down after a page turn ("What a tasty treat!"). A giraffe's snout barely fits on a spread, and when a sperm whale chomps down on a giant squid (in a four-page spread), all readers see are a few teeth, some squirming orange tentacles, and the squid's enormous eye. Yum! Ages 4-8. (Oct.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved.

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School Library Journal PreS-Gr 1-Large, stylized illustrations present a variety of animals and what they can ingest in "just one bite." From a minuscule dot of decaying vegetable matter scooped up by an earthworm to the wriggly mass of a giant squid gripped in the jaw of a toothy sperm whale (quadruple gatefolds for this one), the book helps children to envision the eating habits of critters seen mostly on TV. The brief text repeats the octopus's request for "only the tender parts, please" as he scarfs down a crunchy crab, and a Komodo dragon remarking on the "tasty treat" of a snake-snack. Mouths and mouth parts are shown life-size, leaving (in most cases) the greater part of the head and generally the body out of the strongly delineated illustrations. This is problematic in the case of those species with which youngsters are not familiar. Notes at the back of the book proffer paragraphs about the featured creatures, so parents/teachers will have further fodder for curious young minds. Not in the realistic school of Teruyuki Komiya's photographic More Life-Size Zoo or his Life-Size Aquarium (both Seven Footer Kids, 2010), but attractive, colorful, and impressively big.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list This simple, attractive gallery of animals features life-size creatures, in whole or partial views, along with a single serving of typical food. On an opening page, an earthworm devours a speck of dirt, and each subsequent spread features animals of increasing size in midmeal, from a hummingbird sipping three drops of nectar to a Komodo dragon snacking on a snake to a sperm whale swallowing a giant squid, a scene that's featured in a final, dramatic gatefold. A simple sentence describes each creature's diet, while computer-enhanced, paint-and-crayon artwork depicts the diners and their cuisine simply and clearly, complete with saliva. The animals hail from various ecosystems, and the final creature is a surprise: all-consuming microorganisms, which can eat even the largest animal until it becomes part of the earth that feeds us all. A colorful closing spread includes more information about each species, with facts about diet, number of teeth, and digestion process. Although this lacks the dramatic impact of Steve Jenkins' Actual Size (2004), it's more topically focused and just as capable of soliciting fascination.--Medlar, Andrew Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Sy Montgomery

School Library Journal Gr 5-8-Take a parrot. Color it green. Give it soft, fluffy feathers, and whiskers. Give it sumo proportions and take away its power of flight. Make it nocturnal, and have it nest underground. Aha! A kakapo! Once millions of these rather affable birds waddled all over New Zealand. Reduced (at present) to fewer than 90, the kakapo have been isolated on Codfish Island (free of feral cats, weasels, and stoats-all introduced species) and are now under the strict, careful guardianship of the New Zealand National Kakapo Recovery Team. Montgomery and Bishop were granted 10 days in which to accompany members of the team (many volunteering their time and efforts) as they radio-tracked the birds night and day in their forest habitat, weighed chicks, watched nesting behavior through hidden cameras, and plowed through gale-force winds and torrential rain to monitor the well-being of their charges. Excellent photos and a readable, conversational text provide an intimate look at a concerted effort to save a drastically endangered species unfamiliar to most of the world outside Down Under. Readers who enjoyed this author/photographer team's The Tarantula Scientist (2007) or Quest for the Tree Kangaroo (2006, both Houghton) will gobble up this tribute to ecological science in action.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list *Starred Review* Montgomery and Bishop, whose highly lauded titles include two Sibert Honor Books, offer yet another winning entry in the Scientists in the Field series. This time, the intrepid duo heads to a remote island off the southern tip of New Zealand, where they join a local government-sponsored research team that is working to save the Kakapo parrot from extinction. Weighing in at nearly nine pounds, these beautiful, honey-scented, once-ubiquitous creatures, named the most wonderful of all living birds by a nineteenth-century naturalist, have become a symbol of human civilization's devastating effects on indigenous life, and the New Zealand government is directing significant resources to try to ensure the species' survival. As usual, Montgomery's delight in her subject is contagious, and throughout her enthusiastic text, she nimbly blends scientific and historical facts with immediate, sensory descriptions of fieldwork. Young readers will be fascinated by the incredible measures that the passionate workers follow to help the new birds hatch, and many will share the team's heartbreak when some chicks die. Bishop's photos of the creatures and their habitat are stunning; an awe-inspiring, closing image of the world's eighty-seventh known Kakapo emerging from its shell captures the miracle of birth, for any species. Like many of the team's previous titles, this offers excellent support for units about animal conservation.--Engberg, Gillian Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Frank Serafini

Book list What do you see? In a guessing game that pairs close-up details with large images on the following page, this title in the Looking Closely series spotlights life in the tropical rain forest, including a squirrel monkey, a banana plant, a moth orchid, and a scarlet macaw. The crisp, beautiful photos and the interactive text will draw kids into both the interactive fun and scientific facts, and a final, stirring, double-page spread of the rain forest shows a wide view of where the featured animals and plants live. The astonishing detail will have kids turning back to the small close-ups for repeated viewings.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Cheryl Bardoe

School Library Journal Gr 5-7-Mammoths tend to get a lot of press, while their mastodon cousins accumulate footnotes, so it's nice to see mastodon getting second-banana billing in this attractive look at Ice Age favorites. Bardoe begins with the discovery of a marvelously preserved infant mammoth in Northern Siberia and goes on to discuss anatomy (comparing mastodon tusks and teeth, for example) and to postulate on probable Proboscidan behaviors based on fossil finds and extrapolation of modern elephant lifestyles. The readable text includes two fictional scenarios for fossils being found where they were (e.g., a young bull trapped in a steeper-than-expected water hole) and is nicely larded with interesting information boxes on such topics as "Treasures from the Permafrost." Excellent color photos and competent artwork lend visual interest, as does a Proboscidan "family tree" and a pair of maps (one of which, on Ice Age boundaries, may prove a tad confusing due to overlaps). Team this with Sandra Markle's dramatic Outside and Inside Woolly Mammoths (Walker, 2007) or Windsor Charlton's investigation of the Jarkov mammoth in Woolly Mammoth: Life, Death, and Rediscovery (Scholastic, 2001) for a grand view of an Ice Age icon. Eye-catching and informative.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list This well-designed book opens with two boys finding a strange animal dead on the arctic tundra. Their father hikes four days to a village where the news can be spread; then scientists take away the frozen baby mammoth, the first example found intact, and study it intensively. The book intersperses accounts of the scientists' research and deductions with general information about mammoths and mastodons as well as imagined scenes taking place when they walked the earth. Bardoe draws connections between these Ice Age proboscideans and their modern cousin, the elephant. Back matter includes a glossary and a brief Select References section listing three scientists interviewed by the author and three books on mammoths, two of them for children. The book's large format and heavy paper show off the color illustrations well. Besides maps and charts, there are many photos of scientists at work and artists' depictions of mammoths, from today's paintings to prehistoric cave drawings. A handsome introduction.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Nam Nguyen

Book list The tone of this book is set right off the bat: What does it take to survive in this strife-ridden realm, where cannibalism is common and enemies are indestructible? Subsequent pages take readers through the itty-bitty Thunderdome of the bug world. Each spread offers hyperbolic factoids on different creepy-crawly superstars, from jumping spiders (superpower: Incredible leaping ability ) to mosquitoes (equipment: Two hovering wings, huge eyes, needle-sharp proboscis, super senses ) to honey bees (weakness: Self-destructs when it uses its stinger ). Lesser-known critters are also profiled, including blood flukes, giraffe-necked weevils, and the nearly indestructible water bear, with each formidable fiend rated on intelligence, strength, speed, agility, endurance, and evasion. Hyper-close-up photos detail all manner of stingers, stabbers, pincers, and chompers poking out from plated exoskeletons and hairy abdomens. This entry in the Kingdom series, imported from Australia, is a great way to sneak in some basic science learning amid the din of death and destruction. If kids dare enter.--Chipman, Ian Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Don Lessem

Book list The subtitle, The Most Complete Dinosaur Reference Ever, sets its sights high, but this impressive, oversize volume lives up to the claim. Lessem has written more than 40 books on dinosaurs, and in the opening chapter here, he presents broad basics on their behavior and habitats as well as a look at major discoveries in paleontology. However, it's the later chapters, which devote two pages each to specific dinosaurs, that will hook hard-core dino lovers. The etymology of each dinosaur name is explained, and each is written phonetically so that readers can share their newly acquired knowledge with perfect pronunciation. Tempesta's full-page illustrations appear on every spread and jump off the page, and the dynamic layout, with fact boxes, captions, and a main text, is immensely appealing. A concluding 40-page Dino-Dictionary keys each dinosaur to its family group and provides additional fodder for dinosaur trivia. Books on this topic are certainly nothing new, but Lessem's comprehensive overview will satisfy the interested browser as much as the ardent dinosaur enthusiast.--Anderson, Erin Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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National Geographic
 
2010
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Lynne Mayer
2010
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Nic Bishop

Book list *Starred Review* As in Bishop's earlier volumes on spiders, frogs, marsupials, and butterflies and moths, his remarkable color photos will initially draw readers to the book. But the succinct text is equally riveting as it explores the surprisingly varied world of lizards, from the tiny dwarf gecko, small enough to curl up on your thumbnail, to the Komodo dragon, the world's largest venomous animal. A typical double-page spread includes a couple of paragraphs of information, an exceptionally clear photo, and an informative caption, which includes the degree of image magnification for animals shown larger than actual size. Standout illustrations include a three-image photo of a basilisk sprinting on two legs across the surface of water and a shot of a chameleon, its sticky tongue extended longer than its body, zapping up a cricket. Bishop, who has a doctorate in biological sciences, writes clearly, presenting his subject without anthropomorphism but with empathy. The book's back matter includes a short recommended-reading list, a brief glossary, and a two-page author's note on his experiences photographing lizards for the book, from the rare thorny devil found in a remote Australian desert to the basilisk, for which he built a rain forest pond in his home. Captivating.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Gr 2-5-There's not much to say that hasn't already been said about the high caliber of Bishop's work, and this book is no exception. The photographs capture a variety of lizards in startling detail. Information is presented in much the same format as Butterflies and Moths (2009), Spiders (2007), and Frogs (2008, all Scholastic). A key sentence written in a larger font and different color is set off from the rest of the text on the page. Basic facts about the various lizards are simple to understand, yet written in a voice that draws readers into another world where geckos wriggle out of their skin and flying dragons glide from tree to tree. Endnotes help readers appreciate the amount of work and time that Bishop spent on each photograph and researching his information, particularly for the thorny devil, bearded-dragon hatchlings, and the basilisk, which is photographed literally running on water. Another amazing must-have title.-Cathie Bashaw Morton, Millbrook Central School District, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Johnna Rizzo
 
2010
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Jean Marzollo

School Library Journal PreS-Gr 2-Stories don't come any sweeter than this. Pierre the penguin lives at the California Academy of Sciences. Being an African penguin, he prefers warmer climates. For some reason (it's not clear why), he loses his feathers and thus will not swim because he is too cold. In addition, the other penguins are afraid of him and bray at him. Pam, his caring handler, designs a neoprene wetsuit that keeps him warm when swimming. Over time, his feathers grow back, and the story ends with Pierre making a "nest for his very best friend." Regan's realistic paintings work well with the text and enhance the drama and appeal of the storytelling. The book concludes with "Questions from Kids with Answers from Pam." They include "What is neoprene?" and "How many kinds of penguins are there?" This is an excellent book to share with children as it offers multiple discussion points and curriculum connections.-Stephanie Farnlacher, Trace Crossings Elementary School, Hoover, AL (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Douglas Florian

School Library Journal Gr 3-6-Florian focuses on trees (seeds, bark, leaves, roots, and tree rings) and introduces readers to 13 species from around the world. An oversize, double-page illustration accompanies each poem. Some are read lengthwise, which enables the artist to highlight the awesome height and size of trees. The selections are accessible and concise, with child-friendly wordplay and artful design: of the "spreading," "treading," "always-outward-heading" banyan tree, Florian concludes: "It's not a tree-/It's a forest!" The primitive illustrations-crafted on "primed paper bags" using mixed media including gouache watercolor paints, colored pencils, rubber stamps, oil pastels, and collage-range in nuance from whimsy to mystery and reverence. In "The Seed," Florian highlights the symmetry of trees by laying out the short text in a figure eight, an eternity symbol; this dovetails neatly with the overall theme of recycling and renewal. He concludes with a "Glossatree," a thumbnail sketch of each tree, and an author's note and sources. This exquisite collection, with its thoughtful wordplay and timely subject, rewards careful reading and should resonate with a wide audience.-Marilyn Taniguchi, Beverly Hills Public Library, CA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Book list Starting with the book's title and ending with a final glossatree, the wordplay in Florian's latest poetry collection provides plenty of fun. Each of the 18 poems celebrates the wonder of trees, from the giant sequoia (the world's tallest trees) and the Banyan (an acre in its canopy) to the bristlecone pine, one of the oldest trees on earth (alive for fifty cen-trees). Each poem is printed on a vertical double-page spread illustrated with mixed-media artwork in gouache, watercolor, colored pencil, rubber stamps, oil pastels, and collage on brown paper bags. The dramatic swirling visuals sometimes swamp the words, but the blurry images do leave room for kids to use their imaginations as they interpret the poems. The big pages are well suited for group sharing, as are the playful puns (Lovely leaves / Leave me in awe). The final fascinating notes on each tree, and on leaves, stems, and roots, spell out the call for conservation that is part of the poetry and pictures.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly In this unusual collection, Florian focuses on several types of and parts of a tree, with poems about seeds, roots, bark, leaves, and tree rings ("Tree rings show/ how trees grow./ Wide rings: fast growth./ Narrow rings: slow"). Solid in their meter and rhymes, the poems are idiosyncratic rather than comprehensive, creating a hybrid of information, wordplay, and artistic invention. Appropriately enough, Florian's sophisticated collages are created on primed paper bags allowing him to combine interesting textures, chalk, colored pencils, stamps, and oil pastels. In addition to familiar oaks and birches, Florian (Dinothesaurus) explores more unusual trees, including the dragon tree, monkey puzzle tree, and baobab. The book is designed to be held and read vertically, allowing Florian to showcase the height of trees like the giant sequoia ("Never destroy a/ Giant sequoia") or banyan from treetop to root bottom. However, some may find this makes for awkward lap reading. Teachers in particular will find Florian's "Glossatree" at the end useful. Filled with facts about the trees described in the poems, it also includes a brief bibliography and author's note describing Florian's lifelong fascination with trees. Ages 6-up. (Mar.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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2010
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Pamela S. Turner

School Library Journal Gr 4-8-Project Seahorse follows the work of two dedicated scientists as they explore the life cycle of the tiger tail seahorse and forge partnerships with the people of Handumon in the Philippines to save its habitat. A full-page color map places the islands in their global context and shows the range of seahorses, animals that scientists know little about. The stunning full-color photographs amplify the descriptions of the creatures' life cycle as the male receives the eggs from the female and nurtures them to maturity in his brood pouch. Dangers to their survival appear not only from marine predators but also from unsustainable practices such as blast-fishing and bottom trawling, two techniques that damage and destroy coral reefs. By showing the scientists at work with local villagers and leaders as well as regional and national government representatives, the author stresses the importance of community-based conservation. The photographs of village children replanting mangrove trees and posing on the Project Seahorse boat reveal how involved the local people became. This book is a great addition to any collection and perfect for seahorse, coral reef, or marine-conservation assignments.-Frances E. Millhouser, formerly at Chantilly Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Book list The latest Scientists in the Field entry continues the series' consistently successful approach to giving young enquirers a close look at the natural world and those who study it. Noting that the more than 40 species of sea horse worldwide are all threatened by overfishing and other factors, Turner balances her observations of two biologists who have been instrumental in setting up a Marine Protected Area (MPA) along part of a reef in the Philippines with a profile of one local fisherman and his family who are dependent on the reef's wildlife for their livelihood. Thanks to the fluent, information-rich narrative and to Tuason's engagingly up-close color photos of both human divers and of sea horses and other reef denizens, readers will come away with a much clearer understanding of the sea horse's distinctively oddball biology and also of how one conservation success story hinged on cooperation between scientists and concerned local residents. A perfunctory resource list is the only weakness here.--Peters, John Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Larry Verstraete

Book list This latest entry in the publisher's alphabet series packs a lot of elements into just 26 entries. The science ranges from aviation to zoology, but the featured words are general terms that are useful for all scientists adapt, build, and compare, for starters. Each page includes a four-line poem featuring that page's concept; a sidebar of fairly sophisticated text that describes the discovery of a particular scientist; and gentle yet realistic illustrations. For the poems, which don't always scan, the author sometimes takes an informal tone in describing the scientists, many of whom won't be familiar to elementary-school students: In his classic experiment, / Ivan put dogs in the mood / of licking their chops and slobbering / even without having their food. But the intelligent text makes up for the uneven poetry, elucidating an impressive variety of fields, continents, and time periods (from 265 BCE to the 1991 introduction of the World Wide Web). Ideal for young scientists who haven't yet settled on their specialties.--Nolan, Abby Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Jim Arnosky

Publishers Weekly Arnosky (A Manatee Morning) again focuses on this gentle marine mammal in a story inspired by an actual incident. A fast-moving boat hits a manatee swimming in a shallow Florida canal, crushing her ribs and slicing her back and tail with its propeller. Rescuers move the animal to an aquarium, where her wounds heal and she gives birth to a calf. After mother and baby are returned to the wild, a sign is placed in the waterway, warning skippers to slow down and watch for manatees. "And from then on, that's exactly what the boaters did," writes the author, in a happy if perhaps overly optimistic ending. With the exception of a few striking night scenes, Arnosky's acrylic artwork most resembles vintage "Greetings from Florida!" postcards, as pale washes bring to life the aquamarine waters, fuchsia sunrises, and assorted wildlife of the tropical setting. Text and art work in tandem to present a portrait of a gentle, innocent creature ("She wasn't in a hurry. She had all the time in the world"). A solid addition to naturalist Arnosky's oeuvre. Ages 3-5. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

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School Library Journal Gr 1-3-A pregnant manatee swimming in the shallow waters of a Florida canal is injured when a fast-moving motorboat hits her, cutting her back and tail with its propellers and crushing her ribs against the canal bottom as it passes over her. Luckily, the accident is observed by some fishermen who alert a rescue group that has the equipment to remove her from the canal to a seaside aquarium tank where she can be observed and heal. She soon becomes a favorite of aquarium visitors and, after she gives birth to a healthy calf, both are returned to the same canal where the cow was found, along with a sign-"SLOW DOWN! MANATEES." This fictional account of an actual event is told in a brief, straightforward text. An author's note advises readers that manatees, a protected endangered species, have few natural enemies. Their primary "predators" are boat propellers, which can inflict fatal wounds on them. Once again, Arnosky has produced a short nature lesson designed to introduce young children to an animal and its habitat and to develop appreciation and respect for the natural world. His appealing realistic acrylic wash paintings-most featuring the bright aqua, marine blue, and yellow-greens of the ocean-accurately convey the action.-Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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Book list A pregnant manatee's painful encounter with its species' chief predator people in a motorboat sparks a successful animal-rescue effort in Arnosky's latest foray into natural history. In illustrations done with pale, translucent washes of color, young readers can follow workers as they carefully hoist the injured animal out of the water, transport her to a holding pen until the (bloodless but deep and plainly visible) propeller slashes across her back start to heal, then release her and her newborn baby back into the wild. The gentle giants' behavior is never anthropomorphic here, though a closing claim that boaters from now on will heed a newly posted warning sign ( Slow Down! Manatees ) may be a touch idealistic. An afterword goes into greater depth on the dangers that boats, even those piloted by very careful captains, pose to manatees, and on the real account that inspired this tale.--Peters, John Copyright 2010 Booklist

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2010
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Debbie Miller
 
2010
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Jean Craighead George

Book list Reminiscent of George and Minor's The Wolves Are Back (2008), this handsome book discusses the history of the buffalo on the American plains. Succinctly and gracefully written, it envisions the centuries when Indians carefully managed the land, using the buffalo for food, shelter, and clothing. In the 1800s, government policies brought about the destruction of the tall-grass prairie, the shooting of the American buffalo, and the end of the Plains Indians' traditional way of life. In the early twentieth century, Teddy Roosevelt facilitated efforts to protect the few remaining buffalo. After the 1930s Dust Bowl, farming methods were changed and, eventually, some prairie lands were replanted with native grasses, enabling the return of many buffalo to prairie preserves. The book concludes with a few of the illustrator's sources as well as a list of places to visit in person or online, but no sources for the text, even for the quote from Chief Sitting Bull. Illustrated with beautiful landscape paintings and striking close-ups of people and animals, this book offers a very effective presentation of the buffalo's story.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

Publishers Weekly From the creators of The Wolves Are Back, this graceful story explores how the American buffalo almost became extinct. Minor's striking naturalistic paintings of buffalo and a dust bowl landscape mirror George's sturdy, reflective prose: "When the buffalo lived on the prairie, their sharp hooves helped rain reach down into the earth, and the tough roots of the grass held in the wet." Theodore Roosevelt's establishment of the National Bison Range offers hope for buffalo, and in a moving final spread, a Wichita Indian man counting buffalo for the census welcomes "America's two hundred thousand and eighty-first buffalo" calf. A tribute to an American icon and to the power of preservation. Ages 5-8. (May) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Gr 2-5-This picture book is a hybrid of nonfiction and fiction, as George tells the story of how the buffalo made a comeback in the American Midwest after being nearly decimated in the late 1800s. Beginning with the symbiotic relationship that the buffalo had with the American Indians and the land itself, she goes on to explain how westward expansion and poor decision-making on the part of the American government led to the animals' near extinction. As a result of those actions, the land became barren and inhospitable to any real crop growth, which contributed to the dust storms of the 1930s. With care and protection by a few key individuals, the native grasses and the buffalo were able to make a renaissance, bringing their numbers back up. Eloquent and affecting, the writing transports readers onto the plains and into the past, making the devastation sobering and real. And when the resurgence of both the buffalo and the land is described, it is with jubilation and relief. Accompanied by beautiful, single- or double-page watercolor illustrations that are rich with detail, the prairie comes to life. Excellent for sharing aloud with a group, this title provides a unique perspective on an integral time in American history. A must-have for most libraries.-Jody Kopple, Shady Hill School, Cambridge, MA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Shelley Rotner and Anne Woodhull

School Library Journal Gr 2-4-Excellent color photos provide an eye-catching backdrop for a simple, readable text that explains the importance of bees as pollinators and the current mystery of CCD (Colony Collapse Disorder) as hundreds of thousands of bees vanish without a trace. Children may be surprised to find that almonds are dependent upon bees for pollination, as are cotton plants and apple trees. (The actual fertilization process is not explained.) Rotner and Woodhull offer a look at a variety of bees and other pollinators and a sample of the many products dependent on their efforts. They speculate on current theories as to the cause of CCD and present actions people can take to "Bee Active!" Good online resources and a page of additional data on bees are appended. A far cry from all the "killer bee" hoopla, this title is eye-catching and informative.-Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list One of the most curious signs of serious ecological trouble in the past few years has been the not-yet-fully-understood disappearance of massive numbers of bees, known as Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD). This book is most effective in its clear-sighted explanation of just how crucial bees and their role in pollination are to a wide variety of plants and, in turn, the food we eat: as go the bees, so go cantaloupes, cucumbers, blueberries, peppers, soybeans, watermelons, peaches, tomatoes, pumpkins, onions, and almonds. The possible causes of CCD, however, are hastily listed in a single spread. Therein lies the paradox it's too soon to know for sure what's going on, but by the time we know, it may be too late to do anything about it. So, although the book can't answer the question posed in the subtitle, it succeeds in providing children with coherent background information and ideas to give the bees a hand. The book is supported by a large number of photos, sometimes six or more per page, yet more careful selection might have made for an even stronger presentation.--Chipman, Ian Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2010
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Jacqueline Briggs Martin

Book list With an urgent conservation message, this picture book about a threatened species is also a true adventure that will hold readers with its action and facts about science. In spare, free verse, Martin describes the chiru, which look like antelope / but are related to wild goats and sheep and are at risk from poachers for their special wool, shahtoosh, the warmest and finest in the world. Conservationist George Schaller knows he has to protect the remote, secret place where chiru females give birth, so he follows them, helped by four mountain-climbing trekkers, who travel 200 miles to the birthing ground. The mixed-media spreads illustrate the wonder of the arduous journey that ends when the trekkers find the calving ground, which is now a protected secret place. The threat to the amazing species will move young readers: Wearing a shahtoosh shawl is the same as wearing three to five dead chiru. A spread of color photos from the expedition and a short bibliography conclude.--Rochman, Hazel Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal Gr 1-3-Chiru are small, antelope-type animals that live in the mountains of Tibet. Although their wool is prized for its warmth, super-softness, and strength, the animals cannot be sheared like sheep. Obtaining their expensive skins means killing them, a practice that has resulted in the herds becoming endangered. This book takes a potentially horrifying topic and turns it into a heroic adventure tale. George B. Schaller studied wildlife all over the world, but became particularly interested in Tibet. He knew the chiru needed protection and began a quest to find their hidden breeding grounds. In order to save them, he thought that their land should be protected from hunters. Although he was unable to find the right area, four other men took up the cause. Experienced mountain climbers, they set out on a 200-mile journey through rough terrain following the animals. Their success in discovering the calving grounds gave Schaller the information he needed to lobby the Chinese government to protect the area and give the chiru a chance to survive. This story is told in elegant yet conversational language. Set-off boxes provide important factual information without interrupting the artistic flow of the main text. The acrylic paintings and book design are devised for high effect. The opening pictures employ an icy blue palette, introducing the cold atmosphere of the Tibetan plain. Photographs of the treacherous terrain and the men involved in the project are appended.-Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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DK Publishing

School Library Journal Gr 9 Up-Incorporating hundreds of stunning images and a clearly written text, Roberts's hefty volume begins with an overview of the body covering such topics as human evolution, the human genetic formula, the cell, and body composition. It then moves on to systems, devoting most of its pages to an atlas of human anatomy. Starting from the head and neck and ending at the lower leg and foot, this section illustrates seven regions of the body, primarily employing computer-generated illustrations, but also incorporating cutaway diagrams and clear photos and microscopic and x-ray images. For each designated section of the body, double-page renderings of the skeletal, muscular, nervous, cardiovascular, and lymphatic and immune systems are presented, each clearly introduced and extensively labeled. The extraordinary detail of these pictures will give students an excellent understanding of the body's structure and organization, depicting, layer by layer, the organs that are normally "packed closely together and nestled into cavities, with nerves and vessels twisting around...." Other sections focus on "How the Body Works," "Life Cycle," and "Diseases and Disorders," offering the same graphic detail. There's more text in these chapters, which devote two pages each to a multitude of topics ("Nerve Cells," "Taste and Smell," "Blood Cells"); the images are smaller, but well chosen and more numerous. The DVD offers a selection of pictures from the book. While not all libraries may need such extensive mapping of the human body-Steve Parker's The Human Body (DK, 2007) may suffice for many-there is nothing that rivals Roberts's singular volume.-Daryl Grabarek, School Library Journal (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Loree Griffin Burns

School Library Journal Gr 5-8-The mystery of the vanishing honeybees began in the winter of 2006 when beekeeper Dave Hackenberg inspected 400 of his 3000 hives in Florida and discovered that 20 million bees had simply disappeared. He frantically alerted state bee inspectors and other beekeepers that there was some strange new ailment affecting these insects and asked for help in finding the cause. Soon beekeepers across the country were reporting similar catastrophes. Most of this lucid, fact-filled introduction focuses on the investigation into the problem, now known as "colony collapse disorder," or CCD. Separate chapters cover each of four scientists' line of research and describe their procedures, key tools, equipment, and findings. While no definitive cause for CCD has yet been found, the researchers theorize that the disorder is caused by a combination of the usual bee ailments, the chemicals used to treat them, and a new systemic pesticide employed by farmers. Other chapters include interviews with a hobbyist beekeeper and Hackenberg; they are packed with information on beekeeping and stress the importance of bees as pollinators. Special feature pages profile the scientists and describe the physical and behavioral characteristics of honeybees; hive construction; the making of honey, etc. Clear color photographs of beekeepers, scientists, equipment, close-ups of bees, hives, etc., complement the text on every page. Youngsters concerned with the environment will find this meticulously researched title a valuable resource.-Karey Wehner, formerly at San Francisco Public Library (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list *Starred Review* The author of Tracking Trash (2007), Burns now spotlights a dream team of scientists as they work to determine what is threatening bee colonies and (by extension) agriculture, which depends on bees for pollination. After following hobbyist beekeeper Mary Duane as she inspects her hives, the discussion turns to a commercial beekeeper who reported in 2006 that 20 million bees had vanished in a mysterious and deadly phenomenon now known as colony collapse disorder (CCD). Fully illustrated with excellent color photos, the clearly written text introduces four scientists and follows them from the field to their labs as they investigate possible causes of CCD: pesticides, viruses, bacteria, and pests such as mites. The book demonstrates the urgent need for answers, the challenges of the scientists' ongoing research projects, and the importance of investigating a variety of possibilities. In the final pages, beekeeper Duane harvests honey from her healthy bees' hives. Throughout the presentation, readers learn about the anatomy, development, and social behavior of honey bees and observe the process of scientific investigation and its vital, real-world application. Appended are lists of recommended books, magazines, films, and Web sites as well as a glossary and a source bibliography. A fascinating book from the Scientists in the Field series.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2010
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Sallie Wolf

Publishers Weekly This journal strikes a pensive and tranquil note, emphasizing the simple joys to be found in observing nature, birds in particular, rather than providing specific tactics for identifying species. Cursive lists of North American birds appear under a heading for each season, followed by a collage of bird sketches in ink and watercolor, journal entries, and careful observations that take the form of tender, sometimes surprising poems: "A pair of nuthatches used to visit my feeder every day./ That was before West Nile virus/ spread from bird to bird." It should find an audience in nature-lovers, writers, and other contemplative readers. Ages 9-12. (Feb.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Gr 4-8-Wolf's journal/sketchbook is arranged in eight-page sections by season, each beginning with a list of avian visitors. The charming, eye-catching format includes short dated nature notes written in script, some of them on glued or taped-in torn paper pieces; other paper scraps contain short typeset poems and small, labeled watercolors: an object; a single flower; a bird; a tree in seasonal array. Notes for several poems, showing words or phrases that have been crossed out and changed, are written beside the finished piece. Pen-and-ink sketches capture a baby house sparrow, a V-formation of geese, a downy woodpecker at a suet feeder, and more. Two pages of author's notes explain how Wolf became interested in birds as a result of a seventh-grade project, and how she developed her journaling style. A page of resources includes several outstanding Web sites, some top-notch guides, and books on birding. This small, instructional guide may provide the inspiration for young authors with even a bit of artistic talent to begin keeping nature journals of their own.-Susan Scheps, Shaker Heights Public Library, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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April Pulley Sayre

School Library Journal K-Gr 2-Dangers threaten the survival of sea turtles at every stage of their lives. In this newly illustrated version of a 2000 book of the same title, beautiful pictures in watercolor, gouache, and pastels illustrate many of these risky situations, and the narrative describes how people are working to minimize these threats. The title is repeated on many of the double-page descriptions: a new hatchling is attracted to the porch light-"Turtle, Turtle, Watch Out! Small hands switch off the light," so that the baby turtle changes direction away from the house and toward the moonlight on the water. Other dangers are natural-the night herons and raccoons alert to the scrambling hatchlings, hungry fish awaiting the tiny babies tumbling in the currents. People's life-saving actions are described or shown, e.g., reaching out of a boat into the water to retrieve a plastic bag that could choke a feeding turtle. The illustrations are soft-toned but dramatically interpret such dangers as the looming cat on the beach, menacing sharks, and confining fishing nets. A two-page description of how people throughout the world are helping the seven endangered species of sea turtles survive and the thumbnail sketches of these species provide background. A good read-aloud or read-along choice for environmental awareness.-Frances E. Millhouser, formerly at Chantilly Regional Library, Fairfax County, VA (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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2010
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Joyce Sidman

Publishers Weekly The team behind the Caldecott Honor-winning Song of the Water Boatman pays tribute to biologically successful species-from mollusks and lichens to dandelions and sharks-in poems that appear in order of each animal's first appearance on earth (a striking, mazelike time line puts the billions of years into perspective). Sidman's words are vivid and affectionate-about single-celled diatoms, she writes, "Curl of sea-/ green wave/ alive/ with invisible jewels/ almost/ too beautiful/ to eat," and Prange's expressive linocuts capture the character of each animal. Fascinating factual information appears on each page; the graceful integration of science and art results in a celebratory story of survival. Ages 6-9. (Apr.) (c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

(c) Copyright PWxyz, LLC. All rights reserved

School Library Journal Gr 1-6-This volume of beautifully illustrated poems investigates the natural world, from the single-celled bacteria and diatom to the ever-present ant and dandelion. Well-researched science facts are paired with vivid poems to describe how these very special life-forms avoided extinction to become nature's survivors. The book begins 4.6 billion years ago with a newly formed Earth and continues through time as it introduces 14 types of life that are still with us today. Starting with bacteria (3.8 billion years old) and including mollusks (500 million years old), ants (140 million years old), and coyotes (2.3 million years old), the journey continues to the youngest of species, the "wise humans" or homo sapiens, that have inhabited the Earth for only 100,000 years. An illustrated time line helps bring this massive scale into the realm of children's understanding. Each spread includes a poem, amazing facts, and an exquisite, hand-colored linocut. Sidman uses a variety of poetic structures, including diamante, rhyming couplets, and unrhymed verse, and unexpected language choices to create diverse and vivid word pictures of each species. This melding of science and humor makes for enjoyable reading. The stunning illustrations engage readers and encourage questioning and further exploration. From the depiction of ant tunnels to the surprising perspective of blades of grass, the bold and colorful linocuts are incredibly detailed and successfully capture the essence of each creature as part of its larger environment. A delightful feast for the eyes, ears, and mind.-Carole Phillips, Greenacres Elementary School, Scarsdale, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Book list *Starred Review* The creators of the Caldecott Honor Book Song of the Waterboatman and Other Pond Poems (2005) offer another winning blend of poetry, science, and art in this picture-book collection that celebrates the earth's most resilient and long-lived species. Following Waterboatman's format, each dynamic spread in this remarkable volume features a poem, a prose paragraph, and a captivating illustration that work together perfectly to reinforce both the science concepts and the awe they inspire. Prange's watercolor-tinted linocut illustrations beautifully expand both the information and imagery in the words, beginning with the endpapers' inventive graphic, a densely wound ribbon that shows where each of the poems' featured organisms first appeared in earth's vast time line. Written in a variety of formats, including a few playful concrete selections, Sidman's poems deftly weave in facts, as in Gecko on the Wall : Her tail comes off: / a wriggling prize! Other poems mimic the movements of their subjects: lines in The Ants follow a short, steady marching beat, while a poem about squirrels consists of a single, frantically paced run-on sentence. Sidman's fascinating prose explanations are as gracefully worded as her verse and will excite young readers. Following a full-page glossary, an author's note discusses the evolutionary nature of science itself.--Engberg, Gillian Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

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2010
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David Schwartz and Yael Schy

Book list Moving beyond camouflaged animals, the new volume from the In the Wild series introduces 10 mysterious objects seen in nature. Each spread begins with a short verse, varying in form from rhymed couplets to concrete poems to haiku. The words are set on a white page facing an excellent color photo of, say, a squirrel nest, an owl pellet, or a blob of spittlebug foam. Opening the gatefold reveals more about the object. The clever verse, curious photos, and guessing-game element will engage children, while the clear explanations and photos of details will enlighten them.--Phelan, Carolyn Copyright 2010 Booklist

From Booklist, Copyright American Library Association. Used with permission.

School Library Journal K-Gr 4-A nifty combo of poetry (often of the concrete variety), super color photos, scientific information, and a guessing game (complete with whole-page flaps for lifting). For example, a verse printed in wavy lines reads: "We're long and lithe, we wiggle and writhe. Of dead things we dispose./We daily toil to plow the soil, and help stuff decompose!" Lift the flap to reveal a photo of an earthworm depositing another cast on the pile and several paragraphs of information on the vital work done by these beneficial creatures. The punch line of "Cliff Dweller" says, "My home is warm, but kind of smelly/From scraps of fish once in my belly!" The flap showing a hole in a riverbank reveals a belted kingfisher feeding its young in its burrow and a description with a lot of data including the reason for the stinky aroma. Fun as a read-alone or for one-on-one sharing, this tidy package from a talented trio will delight children (and teachers of whole curriculum, too). Patricia Manning, formerly at Eastchester Public Library, NY (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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